The Pumpkin Eater Was A Bad Husband!

Illustration:  Peter, Peter, Pumpkin Eater.  Mother Goose  Volland Popular Edition.  Edited by Eulalie Osgood Grover.  Illustrated by Frederick Richardson.  Published by P. F. Volland Company: New York, Chicago & Toronto. 1921.

Peter, Peter, pumpkin eater,

Had a wife and couldn’t keep her;

He put her in a pumpkin shell,

And then he kept her very well.

 

Peter, Peter, pumpkin eater,

Had another, and didn’t love her;

Peter learned to read and spell,

And then he loved her very well.

 

Mother Goose

Volland Popular Edition.

Edited by Eulalie Osgood Grover.

Illustrated by Frederick Richardson.

Published by P. F. Volland Company: New York, Chicago & Toronto. 1921.

 

Whatever the elf put the tongue on could speak!

Illustration:  From the story "The Elf at the Grocer's."  Hans Andersen’s Fairy Tales.  By William Woodburn.  Illustrated by Gordon Robinson.  W. & R. Chambers, Limited: London & Edinburgh. 1917.

“The elf first put the tongue on the tub.”

. . . the elf stole away the grocer’s wife’s tongue, for she did not want it while she slept. And now whatever he put it upon was able to speak just as well as the lady herself. It was a good thing the tongue could be in only one place at a time, or what a noise there would have been!

The elf first put the tongue on the tub . . .

Illustration:  From the story "The Elf at the Grocer's."  Hans Andersen’s Fairy Tales.  By William Woodburn.  Illustrated by Gordon Robinson.  W. & R. Chambers, Limited: London & Edinburgh. 1917.

From the story “The Elf at the Grocer’s.”

Hans Andersen’s Fairy Tales.

By William Woodburn.

Illustrated by Gordon Robinson.

W. & R. Chambers, Limited: London & Edinburgh. 1917.

 

Stern Father!

King-Hawksbeak-Once-Upon-A-Time-Sq

THE PRINCESS AND THE RAGGED BALLAD-SINGER

When the old King saw that his daughter only made fun of all her fine suitors, he was very angry. “By my beard,” he swore, “the first beggar who comes to the door shall be her husband!”

Only a few days later a strolling ballad-singer took his stand under one of the castle windows and sang his best in hope of alms. When the King heard him, he said: “Let the fellow come up here.” So the beggar was brought in, ragged, stooping, with wild hair, and whiskers that almost hid his face. He sang to the King and the Princess all the ballads he knew and then held out his torn hat for coppers, or perhaps a bit of silver.

The King said: “Your song has pleased me so much that I will give you instead of money this daughter of mine for your wife.”

The Princess cried out in disgust and dismay. But the King said: “I have sworn by my beard that you, too proud for royal suitors, should marry the first beggar who came to the door. That oath cannot be broken.”

This king could be very stern when he chose, and the tears of his daughter did not move him. The court chaplain was called in and the Princess and the beggar were married then and there.

And then, although his daughter clung to his knees, the King shook her off. “Now you are a beggar-woman, and beggar-women do not live in palaces. Go hence with your husband.”

Illustration from From The Story "King Hawksbeak"  Once Upon a Time.  Edited by Katharine Lee Bates.  Illustrated by Margaret Evans Price.  Rand McNally & Company: Chicago & New York. 1921.

Illustration from From The Story “King Hawksbeak”

Once Upon a Time. 

Edited by Katharine Lee Bates.

Illustrated by Margaret Evans Price.

Rand McNally & Company: Chicago & New York. 1921.

Lick The Platter Clean!

Illustration:  Jack Sprat.  Mother Goose’s Nursery Rhymes.  McLoughlin Brothers: New York. Ca 1900.

“Jack Sprat and his Wife.”

 Jack Sprat could eat no fat,

His wife could eat no lean;

And so betwixt them both, you see,

They licked the platter clean.

Mother Goose’s Nursery Rhymes.

McLoughlin Brothers: New York. Ca 1900.