Fun Without People!

Illustration:  An Old Fable Re-Told.  Animal Antics.  Louis Wain.  S. W. Partridge & Co: London. Ca 1900-1910.

An Old Fable Re-Told.  –  By Aesop Junior.

There was once a donkey – otherwise an ass – though a donkey can hardly have been even other-wise! Well, this ass (I do not speak sneeringly of him, for donkeys cannot help being asses), as I was saying, this creature lived in the strange country known as Animal-land, where there are no people, and we can only guess at the fun that goes on.

Animal Antics.

Louis Wain.

S. W. Partridge & Co: London. Ca 1900-1910.

Old Books & Buns On Sale!

Illustration:  “THE PRACTICAL JOKE.” by Harry B. Neilson.  PETER PIPER’S PEEP SHOW or All the Fun of the Fair.  By: S. H. Hamer.  With Illustrations By: Lewis Baumer and Harry B. Neilson.  Cassell And Company, Ltd.: London, Paris, New York & Melbourne. 1906.

“THE PRACTICAL JOKE.” 

 Little Joey Bun,

He’s the chap for fun,

Sometimes he is really quite provoking.

He’ll always make you laugh,

He’s much too smart by half;

There never seems an end to all his joking.

Father Bun is old –

Joey Bun is bold,

Not a spark of fear in him remaining:

What’s his latest spree?

Well, just look and see.

I don’t think the picture needs explaining.

Illustration:  “THE PRACTICAL JOKE.” by Harry B. Neilson.

PETER PIPER’S PEEP SHOW or All the Fun of the Fair.

By: S. H. Hamer.

With Illustrations By: Lewis Baumer and Harry B. Neilson.

Cassell And Company, Ltd.: London, Paris, New York & Melbourne. 1906.

Puss Kills Rabbits!

Illustration: Puss and Rabbits.  LITTLE FOLKS STORIES  3 Bears, Puss in Boots, Red Riding Hood.  McLoughlin Bro’s: New York. 1888.

“Puss out-wits the Rabbits”

Through the woods and over the fields he ran till he came near a rabbit warren, when he crept more cautiously for fear some of the bunnies might hear him; for they have very sharp ears. He opened the game-bag, into which he had put some bits of cabbage and fresh parsley, and arranging the strings of the bag in a clever way, waited patiently for a visit from the rabbits.

Presently two or three young ones came hopping up and twitching their long ears. They sniffed around for awhile at the entrance of the bag, and then hopped in and began munching and nibbling at the parsley and cabbage, little thinking of the fate that awaited them. All at once the cat gave the string a jerk, and the bunnies were caught in a trap, and though they kicked ever so hard they couldn’t get out. Puss lost no time in killing them, and slinging the game-bag over his shoulder, he set out for the king’s palace.

Illustration: Puss and Rabbits.  LITTLE FOLKS STORIES  3 Bears, Puss in Boots, Red Riding Hood.  McLoughlin Bro’s: New York. 1888.

LITTLE FOLKS STORIES

3 Bears, Puss in Boots, Red Riding Hood.

McLoughlin Bro’s: New York. 1888.

 

Not Good For Any Known Dish, When You Are Dead!

Illustration:  The Cat and The Hare.  Tiny and Her Vanity.  McLoughlin Bros.: New York. 1892.

THE CAT AND THE HARE.

“Puss, puss!” said Tiny, going up to the sleeping beauty, “good morning to you.”  “Oh, good morning; how are you?” replied Puss, “I really did not see you, for I was half asleep after being up all night at a mouse party.”

“Indeed,” said Tiny, “was it amusing?”  “Yes, to me,” said the Cat slyly, with a very slight wink, “not to them.”  “Ah!  I understand,” said Tiny.  “Oh, Puss, Puss!”  “Did you call me?” said a pert young Hare, peeping out from under a large leaved plant.  “You,”  said the Cat, looking down with contempt – “you, Puss.”  “Yes, indeed, I am called Puss in the highest circles,” sharply replied the Hare.

“You are a gipsey, a mere country tramp,” replied the Cat, “without any claim to honest Cat-hood; where is your tail, friend?  Cat, indeed!”  “Tail! Pooh!” said the Hare, “that would be of very little use to me, but just look at my lovely ears; pray, where are yours?”  The Cat did not deign to reply, but rubbed her nose with her paw.

You talk to me!” said the Hare, pertly.  “I, who am sought after by the highest people in the land, and am often at their tables!  I live at large on my own estate, as good a gentleman as any of them; whilst you, are a short-eared, long-tailed servant, living upon the mice, or anything, you can catch; and not good for any known dish, when you are dead!  Ha, ha, ha!  Puss, indeed!  You are a mouse trap.”  So saying, he struck his foot smartly upon the ground, and trotted away.

Tiny and Her Vanity.

McLoughlin Bros.: New York. 1892.

The Pygmies were constantly at war with the Cranes!

Illustration from Tanglewood Tales in THE PYGMIES.  "They were constantly at war with the cranes."

The Pygmies had but one thing to trouble them in the world. They were constantly at war with the cranes, and had always been so, ever since the long-lived Giant could remember. From time to time, very terrible battles had been fought in which sometimes the little men won the victory, and sometimes the cranes. According to some historians, the Pygmies used to go to the battle, mounted on the backs of goats and rams; but such animals as these must have been far too big for Pygmies to ride upon; so that, I rather suppose, they rode on squirrelback, or rabbitback, or ratback, or perhaps got upon hedgehogs, whose prickly quills would be very terrible to the enemy. However this might be, and whatever creatures the Pygmies rode upon, I do not doubt that they made a formidable appearance, armed with sword and spear, and bow and arrow, blowing their tiny trumpet, and shouting their little war cry. They never failed to exhort one another to fight bravely, and recollect that the world had its eyes upon them; although, in simple truth, the only spectator was the Giant Antaeus, with his one, great, stupid eye in the middle of his forehead.

“THE PYGMIES.”

Tanglewood Tales

Nathaniel Hawthorne

Illustrations By:  Milo Winter

Rand McNally & Company:  Chicago & New York.  1913.