Confusing Enchantment!

Illustration:  The Singing, Soaring Lark.  Grimm’s Fairy Tales.  Translated from the German By Margaret Hunt.  Illustrated By John B. Gruelle.  Cupples and Leon Company: New York. Ca 1914.

THE SINGING, SOARING LARK.

“I have seen the white dove, it has flown to the Red Sea, there it has become a lion again, for the seven years are over, and the lion is there fighting with a dragon; the dragon, however, is an enchanted princess.”

Grimm’s Fairy Tales.

Translated from the German By Margaret Hunt.

Illustrated By John B. Gruelle.

Cupples and Leon Company: New York. Ca 1914.

Making Fun Of You!

Illustration:  From the story "KING HAWKSBEAK."  Once Upon a Time.  Edited by Katharine Lee Bates.  Illustrated by Margaret Evans Price.  Rand McNally & Company: Chicago & New York. 1921.

Once upon a time there was an old King who had only one daughter. He was very anxious that his daughter should marry, but while she was more beautiful than words can tell, she was so proud and rude that no man who came to woo her was good enough for her. She sent away one after another and even made fun of them to their faces.

From the story “KING HAWKSBEAK.”

Once Upon a Time.

Edited by Katharine Lee Bates.

Illustrated by Margaret Evans Price.

Rand McNally & Company: Chicago & New York. 1921.

A Full Moon’s Beautiful Lady!

Illustration:  From the Story "THE OWL AND THE MOON."  The Curious Book of Birds.  Written by Abbie Farwell Brown.  Illustrations by E. Boyd Smith.  Houghton, Mifflin & Company: Boston & New York. 1903.

PUTRI BALAN BEGAN TO LAUGH

 When the moon is round and full, if you look very carefully at the golden disk you can see in shadowy outline the profile of a beautiful lady. She is leaning forward as if looking down upon our earth, and there is a little smile upon her sweet lips. This fair dame is Putri Balan, the Princess of the Moon, and she smiles because she remembers how once upon a time she cheated old Mr. Owl, her tiresome lover.

From the Story “THE OWL AND THE MOON.”

The Curious Book of Birds.

Written by Abbie Farwell Brown.

Illustrations by E. Boyd Smith.

Houghton, Mifflin & Company: Boston & New York. 1903.

Cinderella, Are You Sure That Slipper Fits?

Illustration:  All About Cinderella.  Retold and Illustrations by John B. Gruelle.  Cupples & Leon Company: New York. 1916.

“Neither of you can wear it!” cried the page. “Are there any other ladies in the house?”

“No more ladies,” answered the sisters, “but there is a scullion maid, her feet, are much too large for the glass slipper though,” they laughed.

 

All About Cinderella.

Retold and Illustrations by John B. Gruelle.

Cupples & Leon Company: New York. 1916.

 

Ten Kisses!

Illustration:  The Swineherd.  Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen.  Henry Altemus Company: Philadelphia. Ca 1920.

THE SWINEHERD.

“Ask him,” said the princess, “if he will be satisfied with ten kisses from one of my ladies.”

“No, thank you,” said the swineherd: “ten kisses from the princess, or I will keep my pot.”

“That is tiresome,” said the princess. “But you must stand before me, so that nobody can see it.”

The ladies placed themselves in front of her and spread out their dresses, and she gave the swineherd ten kisses and received the pot.

Illustration:  The Swineherd.  Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen.  Henry Altemus Company: Philadelphia. Ca 1920.

Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen.

Henry Altemus Company: Philadelphia. Ca 1920.

A Trumpet Blow For The Giant’s Overthrow!

Illustration:  Overthrow Giant.  Jack The Giant Killer.  W. B. Conkey Company: New York. 1898.

“That will I do,” said Jack.

. . . at last they arrived at the abode of the enchanter Galligantua. And as the door was guarded by two ferocious griffins, Jack put on his coat of darkness and marched through without the least fear, for of course the griffins could not see him; and when he got inside he saw an enormous horn, upon which was written: “Whoever can this trumpet blow, shall cause the giant’s overthrow.”

“That will I do,” said Jack, and he blew a tremendous blast that made the castle walls shake. The griffins fell down dead, and then helter-skelter through the great hall rushed a group of terrified animals. All were Princes and Princesses who had been changed into animals by the enchanter Galligantua. Last of all came a beautiful gazelle and a young deer. When these two saw Jack they fawned on him, and followed him till he came to a small study. Here he found the enchanter and cut off his head with his sharp sword, and as he did so, the deer and the gazelle turned into two beautiful sisters.

Jack The Giant Killer.

W. B. Conkey Company: New York. 1898.

A Real Princess!

Illustration:  From the story "The Real Princess" Princess and the Pea. Hans Andersen’s Fairy Tales.  Written by William Woodburn.  Illustrated by Gordon Robinson.  W. & R. Chambers, Limited, London & Edinburgh. Ca 1917.

The Princess and the Pea.

‘ I have hardly closed my eyes the whole night through. ‘

Illustration:  From the story "The Real Princess" Princess and the Pea. Hans Andersen’s Fairy Tales.  Written by William Woodburn.  Illustrated by Gordon Robinson.  W. & R. Chambers, Limited, London & Edinburgh. Ca 1917.

From the story “The Real Princess”

Hans Andersen’s Fairy Tales.

Written by William Woodburn.

Illustrated by Gordon Robinson.

W. & R. Chambers, Limited, London & Edinburgh. Ca 1917.