Cinderella’s Sad Story!

Illustration:  Cinderella.  The Three Bears’ Picture Book.  Illustrated by Walter Crane.  George Routledge and Sons: London & New York.

There was an honest gentleman, who had a daughter dear;

His wife was dead, he took instead a new one in a year;

She had two daughters – Caroline and Bella were their names;

They called the other daughter Cinderella, to their shames,

Because she had to clean the hearths and black-lead all the grates;

She also had to scrub the floors, and wash the dinner plates.

But though the others went abroad, did nothing, smiled and drest,

Yet Cinderella all the time was prettiest and best.

The King who ruled in that country, he had an only son,

Who gave a ball to all the town, when he was twenty-one;

And Caroline and Bella were invited, and they said,

“Cinderella shall leave scrubbing, and act as ladies maid.”

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The Three Bears’ Picture Book.

Illustrated by Walter Crane.

George Routledge and Sons: London & New York.

Bye, Time To Go!

Illustration:  Billy Vamoose.  Billy Whiskers in the Movies.  By Frances Trego Montgomery.  Illustrated by Paul Hawthorne.  The Saalfield Publishing Company: Akron, Ohio and New York. 1921.

“Now is the time for me to vamoose and find Stubby and Button,” thought Billy to himself as he ran out of the livery stable.

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Billy Whiskers in the Movies.

By Frances Trego Montgomery.

Illustrated by Paul Hawthorne.

The Saalfield Publishing Company: Akron, Ohio and New York. 1921.

Mr. Elephant Goes On A Toddle!

Illustration:  Mr. Elephant Toddled.  From the story “WHEN MR. ELEPHANT TRIED TO BE A MAN.”  Billy Goat’s Story  By Amy Prentice.  Illustrations by J. Watson Davis.  A. L. Burt Company: New York. Ca 1906.

Mr. Elephant toddled around until he was all tired out.

Then he told Mr. Ape that he couldn’t stand up another minute.

“Now what would Mr. Man do if he was feeling the same as I do?” Mr. Elephant asked, and Mr. Ape said:

“Why, he would sit down.”

 

From the story “WHEN MR. ELEPHANT TRIED TO BE A MAN.”

Billy Goat’s Story

By Amy Prentice.

Illustrations by J. Watson Davis.

A. L. Burt Company: New York. Ca 1906.

Elephant Goes Shopping!

Illustration:  When the Elephant goes shopping  Animal Antics.  Louis Wain.  Illustration by Felix Leigh.  S. W. Partridge & Co: London. Ca 1900-1910.

When the Elephant goes shopping,

Oh, he looks a funny “fellah!”

In both hands he carries parcels,

While his trunk holds his umbrella.

Animal Antics.

Louis Wain.

Illustration by Felix Leigh.

S. W. Partridge & Co: London. Ca 1900-1910.

A Big Baby or Tiny Fairies?

Illustration:  The Good King took it to his Palace.  From the story “Prince Darling.”  Fairy Tales From France  Retold by William Trowbridge Larned.  Illustrations by John Rae.  Wise Book Company: New York. Ca 1920.

The Kingdom in which the little Princess was born was a Favorite Dwelling Place for Fairies.

From the story “The Sleeping Beauty in the Wood.”

Fairy Tales From France

Retold by William Trowbridge Larned.

Illustrations by John Rae.

Wise Book Company: New York. Ca 1920.

Cinderella’s Fairy Godmother!

Illustration:  From the story "CINDERELLA OR THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER."  Once Upon a Time.  Edited by Katharine Lee Bates.  Illustrated by Margaret Evans Price.

Cinderella did not see what on earth a pumpkin could have to do with her going to the ball, but she ran quickly, chose the biggest and finest pumpkin on the vines, and carried it to her godmother.

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From the story “CINDERELLA OR THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER.”

Once Upon a Time.

Edited by Katharine Lee Bates.

Illustrated by Margaret Evans Price.

Rand McNally & Company: Chicago & New York. 1921.

Set Free At Midnight!

Illustration:  The Hut In The Forest.  Grimm’s Fairy Tales.  Translated from the German By Margaret Hunt.  Illustrated By John B. Gruelle.  Cupples and Leon Company: New York. Ca 1914.

THE HUT IN THE FOREST.

“I am a King’s son, and was bewitched by a wicked witch, and made to live in this forest, as an old gray-haired man; no one was allowed to be with me but my three attendants in the form of a cock, a hen, and a brindled cow. The spell was not to be broken until a girl came to us whose heart was so good that she showed herself full of love, not only towards mankind, but towards animals – and that thou hast done, and by thee at midnight we were set free, and the old hut in the forest was changed back again into my royal palace.”

Grimm’s Fairy Tales.

Translated from the German By Margaret Hunt.

Illustrated By John B. Gruelle.

Cupples and Leon Company: New York. Ca 1914.

Stranger Danger!

Illustration:  Scarecrow.  The Three Bears’ Picture Book.  Illustrated by Walter Crane.  George Routledge and Sons: London & New York.

“The scarecrow was so sympathetic that they became great friends.”

So he stumbled along by himself till he came to a clearing. There were bright red flags fluttering on the edges of it, and in the middle of the field stood a tall, thin man with a gun pointing straight at Paul.

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In The Miz.

Written by Grace E. Ward.

Illustrations by Clara E. Atwood.

Little, Brown, & Co.: Boston. 1904.

What Is Upstairs?

Illustration:  They Rushed Upstairs.  The Three Bears’ Picture Book.  Illustrated by Walter Crane.  George Routledge and Sons: London & New York.

They rushed upstairs, and Father Bruin, growling.

Cried out, “Who’s lain upon my bed?”

“Who’s lain on mine?” cried Mother Bruin howling;

The Three Bears’ Picture Book.

Illustrated by Walter Crane.

George Routledge and Sons: London & New York.

Jump!

Illustration:  CLICK-E-TY-CLICK, CLICK-E-TY-CLICK, WENT THE WHEELS OVER BUTTON’S HEAD.  Billy Whiskers, Jr. and His Chums.  By Frances Trego Montgomery.  Illustrated by Hugo von Hofsten.  The Saalfield, Publishing Company: Chicago, Akron, Ohio & New York. 1907.

CLICK-E-TY-CLICK, CLICK-E-TY-CLICK, WENT THE WHEELS OVER BUTTON’S HEAD.

Billy Whiskers, Jr. and His Chums.

By Frances Trego Montgomery.

Illustrated by Hugo von Hofsten.

The Saalfield, Publishing Company: Chicago, Akron, Ohio & New York. 1907.

First Wish!

 

Illustration:  “You could think of nothing better to wish for than a Sausage!”  From the story “The Three Wishes.”  Fairy Tales From France  Retold by William Trowbridge Larned.  Illustrations by John Rae.  Wise Book Company: New York. Ca 1920.

“You could think of nothing better to wish for than a Sausage!” 

From the story “The Three Wishes.”

Fairy Tales From France 

Retold by William Trowbridge Larned.

Illustrations by John Rae.

Wise Book Company: New York. Ca 1920.

 

How A Witch Amuses Herself!

Illustration:  Gerda And Witch.  From the story "The Snow Queen."  Hans Andersen’s Fairy Tales.  By William Woodburn.  Illustrated by Gordon Robinson.  W. & R. Chambers, Limited: London & Edinburgh. 1917.

“The old dame combed her hair.”

As she combed little Gerda’s hair, the child thought less and less of Kay, for the old lady was a witch. She did not harm people, however, but used her power only to amuse herself.
.

From the story “The Snow Queen.”

Hans Andersen’s Fairy Tales.

By William Woodburn.

Illustrated by Gordon Robinson.

W. & R. Chambers, Limited: London & Edinburgh. 1917.

When Her Dream Is Over!

Illustration:  From the story "BRIAR ROSE OR THE SLEEPING BEAUTY."  Once Upon a Time.  Edited by Katharine Lee Bates.  Illustrated by Margaret Evans Price.  Rand McNally & Company: Chicago & New York. 1921.

“Your daughter will prick her hand with the spindle and fall to the floor, but instead of dying she will sink into a deep sleep which will last a hundred years. From that sleep, when her dream is over, a king’s son shall waken her.”

From the story “BRIAR ROSE OR THE SLEEPING BEAUTY.”

Once Upon a Time.

Edited by Katharine Lee Bates.

Illustrated by Margaret Evans Price.

Rand McNally & Company: Chicago & New York. 1921.

Depressed About The Cat!

Illustration:  Puss In Boots.  Puss speaks words of comfort to his Master.  From the story "Puss and Boots."  LITTLE FOLKS STORIES.  McLoughlin Bro’s: New York. Ca 1888.

“Puss speaks words of comfort to his Master.”

There was once an old miller who had three sons, and after his death his property was divided among them. . .

But the third son fared the worst of all, for all that fell to his share was a cat, and that was about as good, he thought, as nothing at all.

He sat down to think in what way he could earn a living, and bemoaned his fate with bitter sighs and tears.

“What shall I do?” he cried aloud. “If I kill the cat and sell his skin, that won’t go far toward keeping me out of the poor-house! Oh, how much worse I am off than my brothers!”

The cat sat near his master and heard every word he said; and when he paused for a moment, Puss came forward, and in a clear voice said: “Dear master, do not be so cast down. If you’ll give me a pair of boots and a game-bag you shall have no cause for complaint.”

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From the story “Puss In Boots.”

LITTLE FOLKS STORIES.

Illustration by R. Andre (1867).

McLoughlin Bro’s: New York. Ca 1888.

How Fairies Get There!

Illustration:  The Fairies' Balloon.  A Year With the Fairies.  Written by Anna M. Scott.  Illustrations by M. T. (Penny) Ross.  P. F. Volland & Co.: Chicago, U.S.A. 1914.

The Fairies’ Balloon

The feathery ball of the dandelion gay

Is a silver and white balloon,

It wafts the Fairies clear up to the sky

And they visit the stars and the moon.

.

Sometimes they ride for a night and a day

And sail o’er the billowy main,

And then over mountains and valleys

To their mystical castles in Spain.

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A Year With the Fairies.

Written by Anna M. Scott.

Illustrations by M. T. (Penny) Ross.

P. F. Volland & Co.: Chicago, U.S.A. 1914.

Brothers Void Of Fear!

Illustration:  Lions.  From the story "Valentine And Orson"  The Three Bears’ Picture Book.  Illustrated by Walter Crane.  George Routledge and Sons: London & New York.

But Orson threw the Green Knight down, and bound him with a chain,

And set the lady free; both brothers then start off to gain

The Green Knight’s castle-gates – two roaring lions keep guard there,

But down they crouched when they beheld the brothers void of fear.

   .

From the story “Valentine And Orson”

The Three Bears’ Picture Book.

Illustrated by Walter Crane.

George Routledge and Sons: London & New York.

Confusing Enchantment!

Illustration:  The Singing, Soaring Lark.  Grimm’s Fairy Tales.  Translated from the German By Margaret Hunt.  Illustrated By John B. Gruelle.  Cupples and Leon Company: New York. Ca 1914.

THE SINGING, SOARING LARK.

“I have seen the white dove, it has flown to the Red Sea, there it has become a lion again, for the seven years are over, and the lion is there fighting with a dragon; the dragon, however, is an enchanted princess.”

Grimm’s Fairy Tales.

Translated from the German By Margaret Hunt.

Illustrated By John B. Gruelle.

Cupples and Leon Company: New York. Ca 1914.

The Fox While You Chase A Bird!

Illustration:  From the Story: “THE BLACKBIRD AND THE FOX”  The Curious Book of Birds.  Written by Abbie Farwell Brown.  Illustrations by E. Boyd Smith.  Houghton, Mifflin & Company: Boston & New York. 1903.

HE MANAGED TO FLUTTER OUT OF REACH.

“Look!” cried one of the women, when she caught sight of him. “Oh, look at the little Blackbird there! His wing is broken and he cannot fly. I shall try to catch him.” And she ran as fast as she could, making her hands into a little cage to put over him. The other women, too, set down their baskets, for convenience–set them down right in the middle of the road–and joined the chase after the poor little Blackbird, so lame, so lame! But always, as they came close to him, he managed to flutter out of reach.

From the Story: “THE BLACKBIRD AND THE FOX”

The Curious Book of Birds.

Written by Abbie Farwell Brown.

Illustrations by E. Boyd Smith.

Houghton, Mifflin & Company: Boston & New York. 1903.

My Funny Little House!

Illustration:  Funny Little House.  The Funny Little Book.  Story and Illustrations by Johnny Gruelle.  P. F. Volland Company: New York, Chicago and Toronto. 1918.

“Yes, this is my funny little house, funny little man!” said the funny little lady. “Will you come into my funny little house and have a funny little cup of tea, funny little man?”

 

The Funny Little Book.

Story and Illustrations by Johnny Gruelle.

P. F. Volland Company: New York, Chicago and Toronto. 1918.

 

Making Fun Of You!

Illustration:  From the story "KING HAWKSBEAK."  Once Upon a Time.  Edited by Katharine Lee Bates.  Illustrated by Margaret Evans Price.  Rand McNally & Company: Chicago & New York. 1921.

Once upon a time there was an old King who had only one daughter. He was very anxious that his daughter should marry, but while she was more beautiful than words can tell, she was so proud and rude that no man who came to woo her was good enough for her. She sent away one after another and even made fun of them to their faces.

From the story “KING HAWKSBEAK.”

Once Upon a Time.

Edited by Katharine Lee Bates.

Illustrated by Margaret Evans Price.

Rand McNally & Company: Chicago & New York. 1921.

The Lady Whipped And Slashed My Pony!

Illustration:  Dapple-gray.  A Book of Nursery Rhymes.  Arranged by Charles Welsh.  Illustrated by Clara E. Atwood.  D. C. Heath & Co., Publishers: Boston, New York, Chicago. Ca 1901.

I had a little pony,

His name was Dapple-gray,

I lent him to a lady,

To ride a mile away;

She whipped him, she slashed him,

She rode him through the mire;

I would not lend my pony now

For all the lady’s hire.

A Book of Nursery Rhymes.

Arranged by Charles Welsh.

Illustrated by Clara E. Atwood.

D. C. Heath & Co., Publishers: Boston, New York, Chicago. Ca 1901.

Tennis or What Do They Do That For?

Illustration:  The Jungle Tennis Club.  Animal Antics.  Louis Wain.  S. W. Partridge & Co: London. Ca 1900-1910.

The Jungle Tennis Club.

It was quite a gay company that turned out to the Tennis Match at Jungletown, and as was generally expected Mr. Jimbo came off the winner in the final match with Mr. Leo.

 

Animal Antics.

Louis Wain.

Illustrations by Thomas C. Smith

S. W. Partridge & Co: London. Ca 1900-1910.

The Art Of The Deal!

Illustration:   I’LL GIVE ALL THESE BEANS FOR YOUR COW.  Once Upon a Time.  From the story "JACK AND THE BEANSTALK."  Edited by Katharine Lee Bates.  Illustrated by Margaret Evans Price.  Rand McNally & Company: Chicago & New York. 1921.

I’LL GIVE ALL THESE BEANS FOR YOUR COW.

From the story “JACK AND THE BEANSTALK.”

Once Upon a Time.

Edited by Katharine Lee Bates.

Illustrated by Margaret Evans Price.

Rand McNally & Company: Chicago & New York. 1921.

Turn Back, Turn Back!

Illustration:  The Robber Bridegroom.  Grimm’s Fairy Tales.  Translated from the German By Margaret Hunt.  Illustrated By John B. Gruelle.  Cupples and Leon Company: New York. Ca 1914.

THE ROBBER BRIDEGROOM.

“Turn back, turn back, young maiden dear,

‘Tis a murderer’s house you enter here.”

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Grimm’s Fairy Tales.

Translated from the German By Margaret Hunt.

Illustrated By John B. Gruelle.

Cupples and Leon Company: New York. Ca 1914.

Special Paints!

Illustration:  The Portrait Painter.  PETER PIPER’S PEEP SHOW or All the Fun of the Fair.  Written by S. H. Hamer.  With Illustrations by Lewis Baumer and Harry B. Neilson.  Cassell And Company, Ltd.: London, Paris, New York & Melbourne. 1906.

“I WENT OVER TO LOOK AT HIS PAINT-BOX”

“Dear, dear! My lad has put too much carrot in this time.” And he began to mix his paints in a great hurry, while the Lady Pig simpered and smiled, and said.

“Oh, Mr. Daubs, you are a funny fellow!”

When he had finished, I went over to look at his paint-box, for I had never heard of anyone using carrots to paint with before, and I thought he must have made a mistake, and had meant Carmine or Crimson Lake, or Yellow Ochre, or Green Bice, or one of the proper paints; but there it was in a dear little tube, labeled “Finest Carrot,” and there was another tube of “Turnip,” and one of “Mangold-Wurzel,” and one of “Parsnip,” and altogether they were the funniest paints I had ever seen.

 

Story: The Extraordinary Adventures of Dicker and Me.

Chapter III. – The Portrait-Painter.

PETER PIPER’S PEEP SHOW or All the Fun of the Fair.

Written by S. H. Hamer.

With Illustrations by Lewis Baumer and Harry B. Neilson.

Cassell And Company, Ltd.: London, Paris, New York & Melbourne. 1906.

 

Rock An Elephant Baby!

Illustration:  Rocking the Cradle.  THE ADVENTURES OF MOLLIE, WADDY AND TONY.  Written by Paul Waitt.  Illustrations by Clara E. Atwood.  Little, Brown, and Company: Boston. 1915.

“Then he began the business of rocking that cradle.”

A tiny cradle, – it was a real baby’s cradle, – had been placed near the center of the stage. Tony soberly walked up to it and gently laid the baby elephant in the cradle, pulling up the bedclothes with his clever trunk and tenderly covering the baby.

Picking up a match from a table close by, he scratched it, and lit a candle on the table. Then he began the business of rocking the cradle, in such a funny manner that the boys and girls just shrieked with laughter.

 

Chapter XIV.  –  The Elephant Firemen.

THE ADVENTURES OF MOLLIE, WADDY AND TONY.

Written by Paul Waitt.

Illustrations by Clara E. Atwood.

Little, Brown, and Company: Boston. 1915.