Santa’s Giant Helper? Helpers?

Illustration:  Jack the Giant Killer.  Once Upon a Time.  Edited by Katharine Lee Bates.  Illustrated by Margaret Evans Price.  Rand McNally & Company: Chicago & New York. 1921.

The Giant.

From the story “Jack The Giant Killer.”

Once Upon a Time.

Edited by Katharine Lee Bates.

Illustrated by Margaret Evans Price.

Rand McNally & Company: Chicago & New York. 1921.

Magic Beans!

Illustration:  Magic Beans.  Fairy Tales Every Child Should Know.  Edited by: Hamilton Wright Mabie.  Illustrated and Decorated by: Mary Hamilton Fry.  George Sully & Company: New York. 1915.

“THE BUTCHER OFFERED ALL THE BEANS IN HIS HAT FOR THE COW.”

Fairy Tales Every Child Should Know.

Edited by: Hamilton Wright Mabie.

Illustrated and Decorated by: Mary Hamilton Fry.

George Sully & Company: New York. 1915.

Illustration:  Magic Beans.  Fairy Tales Every Child Should Know.  Edited by: Hamilton Wright Mabie.  Illustrated and Decorated by: Mary Hamilton Fry.  George Sully & Company: New York. 1915.

I’ll Grind His Bones To Make My Bread!

Illustration:  Jack The Giant Killer.  W. B. Conkey Company: New York. 1898.

“Fe, fi, fo, fum, I smell the blood of an Englishman;

Be he alive, or be he dead, I’ll grind his bones to make my bread.”

[h]e called out, for he could smell Jack, though he could not see him.

“Well,” said Jack, taking off his coat, “you may catch me if you like.” Then round the courtyard he ran with the giant after him. Across the drawbridge he darted, and after him lumbered the giant, but his weight was so great that crash went the bridge, and he fell in the moat and was drowned.

Illustration:  Jack The Giant Killer.  W. B. Conkey Company: New York. 1898.

Jack The Giant Killer.

W. B. Conkey Company: New York. 1898.

A Trumpet Blow For The Giant’s Overthrow!

Illustration:  Overthrow Giant.  Jack The Giant Killer.  W. B. Conkey Company: New York. 1898.

“That will I do,” said Jack.

. . . at last they arrived at the abode of the enchanter Galligantua. And as the door was guarded by two ferocious griffins, Jack put on his coat of darkness and marched through without the least fear, for of course the griffins could not see him; and when he got inside he saw an enormous horn, upon which was written: “Whoever can this trumpet blow, shall cause the giant’s overthrow.”

“That will I do,” said Jack, and he blew a tremendous blast that made the castle walls shake. The griffins fell down dead, and then helter-skelter through the great hall rushed a group of terrified animals. All were Princes and Princesses who had been changed into animals by the enchanter Galligantua. Last of all came a beautiful gazelle and a young deer. When these two saw Jack they fawned on him, and followed him till he came to a small study. Here he found the enchanter and cut off his head with his sharp sword, and as he did so, the deer and the gazelle turned into two beautiful sisters.

Jack The Giant Killer.

W. B. Conkey Company: New York. 1898.

Jack the Giant Killer!

Illustration:  Cormoran Dead.  Jack The Giant Killer.  W. B. Conkey Company: New York. 1898.

Dead Giant.

Close by there was a huge castle, which belonged to a giant called Cormoran. He was eighteen feet high, and when he was very hungry he would walk down into the village, pick up a man in each hand, and carry them off to broil for his breakfast.

Now Jack determined to put a stop to this, so . . . he struck the giant a heavy blow on his head with the pole-axe and killed him. Then he cut off his head and brought it home to the village, and the peasants were so pleased to see Cormoran dead, that they clubbed together and bought Jack a sword, on which was written in gold letters:

“This is the valiant Englishman,

Who slew the giant Cormoran.”

And after that they gave him the name of “Jack the Giant Killer,” and so he is always called.

Jack The Giant Killer.

W. B. Conkey Company: New York. 1898.