How Fairies Get There!

Illustration:  The Fairies' Balloon.  A Year With the Fairies.  Written by Anna M. Scott.  Illustrations by M. T. (Penny) Ross.  P. F. Volland & Co.: Chicago, U.S.A. 1914.

The Fairies’ Balloon

The feathery ball of the dandelion gay

Is a silver and white balloon,

It wafts the Fairies clear up to the sky

And they visit the stars and the moon.

.

Sometimes they ride for a night and a day

And sail o’er the billowy main,

And then over mountains and valleys

To their mystical castles in Spain.

.

A Year With the Fairies.

Written by Anna M. Scott.

Illustrations by M. T. (Penny) Ross.

P. F. Volland & Co.: Chicago, U.S.A. 1914.

The Fox While You Chase A Bird!

Illustration:  From the Story: “THE BLACKBIRD AND THE FOX”  The Curious Book of Birds.  Written by Abbie Farwell Brown.  Illustrations by E. Boyd Smith.  Houghton, Mifflin & Company: Boston & New York. 1903.

HE MANAGED TO FLUTTER OUT OF REACH.

“Look!” cried one of the women, when she caught sight of him. “Oh, look at the little Blackbird there! His wing is broken and he cannot fly. I shall try to catch him.” And she ran as fast as she could, making her hands into a little cage to put over him. The other women, too, set down their baskets, for convenience–set them down right in the middle of the road–and joined the chase after the poor little Blackbird, so lame, so lame! But always, as they came close to him, he managed to flutter out of reach.

From the Story: “THE BLACKBIRD AND THE FOX”

The Curious Book of Birds.

Written by Abbie Farwell Brown.

Illustrations by E. Boyd Smith.

Houghton, Mifflin & Company: Boston & New York. 1903.

Fun Without People!

Illustration:  An Old Fable Re-Told.  Animal Antics.  Louis Wain.  S. W. Partridge & Co: London. Ca 1900-1910.

An Old Fable Re-Told.  –  By Aesop Junior.

There was once a donkey – otherwise an ass – though a donkey can hardly have been even other-wise! Well, this ass (I do not speak sneeringly of him, for donkeys cannot help being asses), as I was saying, this creature lived in the strange country known as Animal-land, where there are no people, and we can only guess at the fun that goes on.

Animal Antics.

Louis Wain.

S. W. Partridge & Co: London. Ca 1900-1910.

Polar Bear, King, Paul & Icicle!

Illustration:  Ice King from In The Miz.  Written by Grace E. Ward.  Illustrations by Clara E. Atwood.  Little, Brown, & Co.: Boston.  1904.

“He looked at Paul with an icy stare and bowed stiffly.”

At that moment Paul saw sticking out of the great fields of ice and snow a pole, not unlike an ordinary clothes-pole, against which leaned a huge misshapen figure made apparently of blocks of ice. One arm was twisted around the North Pole and the other rested on the head of a Polar Bear. The giant had two deep eyes that were blue like the color one sees in the heart of a great iceberg or the waters of Lake Lucerne. He looked at Paul with an icy stare and bowed stiffly. Paul felt a bit homesick, it was so still and solemn.

“That’s a rather cold welcome,” said the Icicle, “but dear me ! what can you expect at the North Pole? Don’t mind if he is cool to you. He can’t help it.”

Then the Icicle stepped in front of the giant and saluted with his right hand, saying:

“O King, freeze forever!

O King, melt thou never!”

“Let me hear your report,” said the giant king of the North.

“O King,” answered the Icicle, “I have done thine errands. Six pairs of men’s ears have I frozen, three miles of sidewalks have I made so slippery that the people cannot stand up on them, four water-pipes have I frozen so that people can get no water . . .”

In The Miz.

Written by Grace E. Ward.

Illustrations by Clara E. Atwood.

Little, Brown, & Co.: Boston.  1904.