Sing From The Heart!

Illustration:  “THE SONG WAS ‘THREE BLIND MICE.’ ”   From the story "The Extraordinary Adventures of Dicker and Me."  Chapter IV. – The Concert – And How Dicker Played a Trick.  PETER PIPER’S PEEP SHOW or All the Fun of the Fair.  Written by S. H. Hamer.  With Illustrations by Lewis Baumer and Harry B. Neilson.  Cassell And Company, Ltd.: London, Paris, New York & Melbourne. 1906.

“THE SONG WAS ‘THREE BLIND MICE.’ ”

 From the story “The Extraordinary Adventures of Dicker and Me.”

Chapter IV. – The Concert – And How Dicker Played a Trick.

PETER PIPER’S PEEP SHOW or All the Fun of the Fair.

Written by S. H. Hamer.

With Illustrations by Lewis Baumer and Harry B. Neilson.

Cassell And Company, Ltd.: London, Paris, New York & Melbourne. 1906.

How Fairies Get There!

Illustration:  The Fairies' Balloon.  A Year With the Fairies.  Written by Anna M. Scott.  Illustrations by M. T. (Penny) Ross.  P. F. Volland & Co.: Chicago, U.S.A. 1914.

The Fairies’ Balloon

The feathery ball of the dandelion gay

Is a silver and white balloon,

It wafts the Fairies clear up to the sky

And they visit the stars and the moon.

.

Sometimes they ride for a night and a day

And sail o’er the billowy main,

And then over mountains and valleys

To their mystical castles in Spain.

.

A Year With the Fairies.

Written by Anna M. Scott.

Illustrations by M. T. (Penny) Ross.

P. F. Volland & Co.: Chicago, U.S.A. 1914.

Confusing Enchantment!

Illustration:  The Singing, Soaring Lark.  Grimm’s Fairy Tales.  Translated from the German By Margaret Hunt.  Illustrated By John B. Gruelle.  Cupples and Leon Company: New York. Ca 1914.

THE SINGING, SOARING LARK.

“I have seen the white dove, it has flown to the Red Sea, there it has become a lion again, for the seven years are over, and the lion is there fighting with a dragon; the dragon, however, is an enchanted princess.”

Grimm’s Fairy Tales.

Translated from the German By Margaret Hunt.

Illustrated By John B. Gruelle.

Cupples and Leon Company: New York. Ca 1914.

Making Fun Of You!

Illustration:  From the story "KING HAWKSBEAK."  Once Upon a Time.  Edited by Katharine Lee Bates.  Illustrated by Margaret Evans Price.  Rand McNally & Company: Chicago & New York. 1921.

Once upon a time there was an old King who had only one daughter. He was very anxious that his daughter should marry, but while she was more beautiful than words can tell, she was so proud and rude that no man who came to woo her was good enough for her. She sent away one after another and even made fun of them to their faces.

From the story “KING HAWKSBEAK.”

Once Upon a Time.

Edited by Katharine Lee Bates.

Illustrated by Margaret Evans Price.

Rand McNally & Company: Chicago & New York. 1921.

The Loser Beat His Pig!

Illustration:  From the story “The Extraordinary Adventures of Dicker and Me.”  Chapter V. – The Great Race – Won by a Length  PETER PIPER’S PEEP SHOW or All the Fun of the Fair.  Written by S. H. Hamer.  With Illustrations by Lewis Baumer and Harry B. Neilson.  Cassell And Company, Ltd.: London, Paris, New York & Melbourne. 1906.

“Won Easily by a Length”

Slowly they began to creep up – now they were only half a length behind, now they were only a nose behind, now they were level, now they were gaining – now they were ahead! Sandy Jimmy began to get very angry, and pulled out a little whip and started beating Mr. Algernon Daubs Esquire as hard as he could.

That settled it! Mr. Algernon Daubs Esquire was so surprised and angry, and hot and tired, that he gave up directly, and Dicker and Major Porker won easily by a length.

From the story “The Extraordinary Adventures of Dicker and Me.”

Chapter V. – The Great Race – Won by a Length

PETER PIPER’S PEEP SHOW or All the Fun of the Fair.

Written by S. H. Hamer.

With Illustrations by Lewis Baumer and Harry B. Neilson.

Cassell And Company, Ltd.: London, Paris, New York & Melbourne. 1906.

Special Paints!

Illustration:  The Portrait Painter.  PETER PIPER’S PEEP SHOW or All the Fun of the Fair.  Written by S. H. Hamer.  With Illustrations by Lewis Baumer and Harry B. Neilson.  Cassell And Company, Ltd.: London, Paris, New York & Melbourne. 1906.

“I WENT OVER TO LOOK AT HIS PAINT-BOX”

“Dear, dear! My lad has put too much carrot in this time.” And he began to mix his paints in a great hurry, while the Lady Pig simpered and smiled, and said.

“Oh, Mr. Daubs, you are a funny fellow!”

When he had finished, I went over to look at his paint-box, for I had never heard of anyone using carrots to paint with before, and I thought he must have made a mistake, and had meant Carmine or Crimson Lake, or Yellow Ochre, or Green Bice, or one of the proper paints; but there it was in a dear little tube, labeled “Finest Carrot,” and there was another tube of “Turnip,” and one of “Mangold-Wurzel,” and one of “Parsnip,” and altogether they were the funniest paints I had ever seen.

 

Story: The Extraordinary Adventures of Dicker and Me.

Chapter III. – The Portrait-Painter.

PETER PIPER’S PEEP SHOW or All the Fun of the Fair.

Written by S. H. Hamer.

With Illustrations by Lewis Baumer and Harry B. Neilson.

Cassell And Company, Ltd.: London, Paris, New York & Melbourne. 1906.

 

Cinderella, Are You Sure That Slipper Fits?

Illustration:  All About Cinderella.  Retold and Illustrations by John B. Gruelle.  Cupples & Leon Company: New York. 1916.

“Neither of you can wear it!” cried the page. “Are there any other ladies in the house?”

“No more ladies,” answered the sisters, “but there is a scullion maid, her feet, are much too large for the glass slipper though,” they laughed.

 

All About Cinderella.

Retold and Illustrations by John B. Gruelle.

Cupples & Leon Company: New York. 1916.

 

Stuck To A Golden Goose!

Illustration:  The Golden Goose.  Grimm’s Fairy Tales.  Translated from the German By Margaret Hunt.  Illustrated By John B. Gruelle.  Cupples and Leon Company: New York. Ca 1914.

THE GOLDEN GOOSE.

. . . she seized the goose by the wing, but her finger and hand remained sticking fast to it.

The second came soon afterwards, thinking only of how she might get a feather for herself, but she had scarcely touched her sister than she was held fast.

At last the third also came with the like intent, and the others screamed out, “Keep away; for goodness’ sake keep away!” But she did not understand why she was to keep away. “The others are there,” she thought, “I may as well be there too,” and ran to them; but as soon as she had touched her sister, she remained sticking fast to her.

Grimm’s Fairy Tales.

Translated from the German By Margaret Hunt.

Illustrated By John B. Gruelle.

Cupples and Leon Company: New York. Ca 1914.

Ten Kisses!

Illustration:  The Swineherd.  Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen.  Henry Altemus Company: Philadelphia. Ca 1920.

THE SWINEHERD.

“Ask him,” said the princess, “if he will be satisfied with ten kisses from one of my ladies.”

“No, thank you,” said the swineherd: “ten kisses from the princess, or I will keep my pot.”

“That is tiresome,” said the princess. “But you must stand before me, so that nobody can see it.”

The ladies placed themselves in front of her and spread out their dresses, and she gave the swineherd ten kisses and received the pot.

Illustration:  The Swineherd.  Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen.  Henry Altemus Company: Philadelphia. Ca 1920.

Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen.

Henry Altemus Company: Philadelphia. Ca 1920.

Please Man!

Illustration:  Straw For A House.  The Story of The Three Little Pigs.  McLoughlin Bro’s: New York. Ca 1900.

. . . met a man with a bundle of straw, and said to him, “Please man, give me that straw to build me a house;” which the man did, and the little pig built a house with it.

The Story of The Three Little Pigs.

McLoughlin Bro’s: New York. Ca 1900.

Puffy’s Doctor & The Dog Thief!

Illustration:  Puffy With Doctor & Dog Thief.  The Three Bears’ Picture Book.  Illustrated by Walter Crane.  George Routledge and Sons: London & New York.

But once the little thing fell off a chair,

And put his shoulder out with that sad tumble;

The doctor set and bound it up with care,

While Puffy looked so very wan and humble.

 

One day he ran out in the street to play

With little friends (his Missis, who will warn her!)

He strays too far, – at last is borne away

By a bad man who lived just round the corner.

To his poor Missis none can comfort say,

Her grief by sighs and tears so plainly marking:

When he’d been gone a twelvemonth and a day,

Outside the door was heard familiar barking.

Illustration:  Puffy With Doctor & Dog Thief.  The Three Bears’ Picture Book.  Illustrated by Walter Crane.  George Routledge and Sons: London & New York.

The Three Bears’ Picture Book.

Illustrated by Walter Crane.

George Routledge and Sons: London & New York.

 

 

Silence and Suffering For The Wild Swans!

Illustration:  From the story "The Wild Swans."  Hans Andersen’s Fairy Tales.  Written by William Woodburn.  Illustrated by Gordon Robinson.  W. & R. Chambers, Limited: London & Edinburgh. 1917.

“She plucked with her own soft hands the ugly stinging-nettles.”

“Do you see these stinging-nettles which I have in my hand? There are many of the same kind growing round the cave where you are sleeping; only those that grow there or on the graves in the churchyard are of use – remember that! You must pluck them, although they will sting your hands; you must trample on the nettles with your feet, and get yarn from them; and with this yarn you must weave eleven shirts with long sleeves.”

“If these are thrown over the eleven wild swans, the spell will be broken. But mark this: from the moment that you begin your work till it is ended, even should it take you years, you must not speak a word. The first word that escapes your lips will fall like a dagger into the hearts of your brothers. Their lives hang on your tongue. Mark well all this!”

As the fairy took her leave, she touched Elise’s hands with a nettle. This made them burn like fire, and caused her to wake. . .

Illustration:  From the story "The Wild Swans."  Hans Andersen’s Fairy Tales.  Written by William Woodburn.  Illustrated by Gordon Robinson.  W. & R. Chambers, Limited: London & Edinburgh. 1917.

From the story “The Wild Swans.”

Hans Andersen’s Fairy Tales.

Written by William Woodburn.

Illustrated by Gordon Robinson.

W. & R. Chambers, Limited: London & Edinburgh. 1917.

 

 

A Real Princess!

Illustration:  From the story "The Real Princess" Princess and the Pea. Hans Andersen’s Fairy Tales.  Written by William Woodburn.  Illustrated by Gordon Robinson.  W. & R. Chambers, Limited, London & Edinburgh. Ca 1917.

The Princess and the Pea.

‘ I have hardly closed my eyes the whole night through. ‘

Illustration:  From the story "The Real Princess" Princess and the Pea. Hans Andersen’s Fairy Tales.  Written by William Woodburn.  Illustrated by Gordon Robinson.  W. & R. Chambers, Limited, London & Edinburgh. Ca 1917.

From the story “The Real Princess”

Hans Andersen’s Fairy Tales.

Written by William Woodburn.

Illustrated by Gordon Robinson.

W. & R. Chambers, Limited, London & Edinburgh. Ca 1917.

 

Fairy Tailors Measure Tom Thumb!

Illustration:  Tom Thumb & The Tailors.  ONCE UPON A TIME.  Edited by Katharine Lee Bates.  Illustrated by Margaret Evans Price.  Rand McNally & Company: Chicago & New York. 1921.

“TOM THUMB & THE FAIRY TAILORS”

One summer morning when the wee baby was only a few days old, the queen of the fairies flew in at the window of the room where he lay. She touched his cheek lightly with a butterfly kiss and gave him the name of Tom Thumb.  She then ordered her fairy tailors to make for Tom a wonderful suit, his hat of an oak leaf, his shirt of a spider’s web, his jacket of thistledown, his trousers of apple-rind, and his shoes of the skin of a mouse, nicely tanned, with the hair inside.

Illustration:  Tom Thumb & The Tailors.  ONCE UPON A TIME.  Edited by Katharine Lee Bates.  Illustrated by Margaret Evans Price.  Rand McNally & Company: Chicago & New York. 1921.

ONCE UPON A TIME.

Edited by Katharine Lee Bates.

Illustrated by Margaret Evans Price.

Rand McNally & Company: Chicago & New York. 1921.

The Dog Smoking & Drinking Beer!

MOTHER HUBBARD.  Walter Crane’s Picture Books Re-Issue.  John Lane.  The Bodley Head: London & New York. 1897.

She took a clean dish

To get him some tripe,

But when she came back,

He was smoking a pipe.

She went to the ale-house

To get him some beer,

But when she came back,

The Dog sat in a chair.

 

MOTHER HUBBARD.

Walter Crane’s Picture Books Re-Issue.

John Lane.

The Bodley Head: London & New York. 1897.

 

First Aid For A Swoon!

Illustration: From the story "The Sleeping Beauty"  MOTHER FAIRY-TALES.  Henry Altemus Company: Philadelphia. 1908.

The Swoon

. . . the spindle immediately ran into her hand, and she directly fell down upon the ground in a swoon. Thereupon the old woman cried out for help, and people came in from every quarter in great numbers: some threw water upon the princess’s face, unlaced her, struck her on the palm of her hands, and rubbed her temples with Hungary water; but all they could do did not bring her to herself.

 

Illustration: From the story "The Sleeping Beauty"  MOTHER FAIRY-TALES.  Henry Altemus Company: Philadelphia. 1908.

From the story “The Sleeping Beauty”

MOTHER FAIRY-TALES

Henry Altemus Company: Philadelphia. 1908.

 

Tom Thumb!

Illustration: Tom Thumb.  Once Upon A Time.  Edited by Katharine Lee Bates.  Illustrations by Margaret Evans Price.  Rand McNally & Company: Chicago & New York. 1921.

. . . Tom Thumb’s mother took him with her when she went to milk the cow.  It was a very windy evening and she tied the little fellow with a needleful of thread to a thistle, that he might not be blown away.  Tom had a fine time, swinging and singing and talking with the bees and butterflies.  But by the by a big red cow came along and, taking a fancy to his oak-leaf hat, picked him and the thistle up at one mouthful.  When the cow began to chew the thistle, Tom was dreadfully frightened at her great teeth, and called out:  “Mother! Mother!”

“Where are you, my dear boy?” cried his mother in alarm.

“Here, mother, here in the red cow’s mouth.”

Once Upon A Time.

Edited by Katharine Lee Bates.

Illustrations by Margaret Evans Price.

Rand McNally & Company: Chicago & New York. 1921.

The Flying Trunk!

Flying-Trunk-Hans-Andersen's-SQ

“Away flew the trunk into the clouds.”

 . . . and, lo! away flew the trunk with him up the chimney, high into the clouds. On and on he flew, higher and higher. The bottom of the trunk gave a great crack, which rather frightened him, for if it had broken in two a pretty fall he would have had!

However, it came down safely, and he found himself in a country called Turkey. He hid the trunk under a heap of dry leaves in a wood, and walked into the town close by. He could do this quite well, for, among the Turks, everybody went about clad as he was, in dressing gown and slippers.

Illustration:  The Flying Trunk.  Hans Andersen’s Fairy Tales.  By William Woodburn.  Illustrated by Gordon Robinson.  W. & R. Chambers, Limited: London & Edinburgh. 1917.

Hans Andersen’s Fairy Tales.

By William Woodburn.

Illustrated by Gordon Robinson.

W. & R. Chambers, Limited: London & Edinburgh. 1917.

The Taboo of Red Shoes!

The-Red-Shoes-Fairy-Tales-By-Hans-Christian-Andersen-Sq

THE RED SHOES.

They fitted her, and were bought. But the old lady knew nothing of their being red, for she would never have allowed Karen to be confirmed in red shoes, as she was now to be.

Illustration:  The Red Shoes.  Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen.  Henry Altemus Company:  Philadelphia.  Ca 1920.

Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen.

Henry Altemus Company: Philadelphia. Ca 1920.

Easter Must Have A Pale Pink Innovation!

Illustration:  Morning-Glory's Easter Bonnet.  A YEAR WITH THE FAIRIES.  Written by Anna M. Scott.  Illustrations by M. T. Ross.  Published by P. F. Volland & Co.: Chicago. 1914.

Morning-Glory’s Easter Bonnet

Miss Glory, discarding last year’s creation,

For Easter must have a pale pink innovation;

The dream of last year is faded and small,

And blue’s the wrong color – it’s not chic at all.

“An American Beauty,” says Posy, “is style,

To wear my old bonnet is hardly worth while,

Since Paris proclaims that a Madame Cochet

Is entirely too small and absurdly passé.”

A YEAR WITH THE FAIRIES.

Written by Anna M. Scott.

Illustrations by M. T. Ross.

Published by P. F. Volland & Co.: Chicago. 1914.

How To Build a Bumble Dragon!

Illustration:  Bumble Dragon.  From the Story “THE BUMBLE DRAGON”  Billy Popgun  Written and Illustrated by Milo Winter.  Houghton Mifflin Company: Boston & New York. 1912.

“THE BUMBLE DRAGON” 

All at once he came to an open place with huge rocks in it, and right in the middle lay an enormous Dragon.

He was sound asleep and snoring in a low rumble, every now and then coming to a very loud snort, and mumbling afterward.

Billy took a good long look at him. His body looked like a gigantic lizard with a long snake’s tail. His large webbed feet had claws like an eagle. But his head! Oh! What a funny head he had. It looked like a cow’s head, only there were scales on it, and a lion’s mane, and dog’s ears. Billy was just beginning to wonder why he was called a Bumble Dragon when he saw the great transparent wings of a Bumble Bee folded over his back.

From the Story “THE BUMBLE DRAGON”

Billy Popgun

Written and Illustrated by Milo Winter.

Houghton Mifflin Company: Boston & New York. 1912.

The Sorrow of Being Late!

Illustration: Such a Gorgeous Coat.  The Curious Book of Birds.  Written by Abbie Farwell Brown.  Illustrations by E. Boyd Smith.  Houghton, Mifflin & Company: Boston & New York. 1903.

SUCH A GORGEOUS COAT!

“O Father!” he panted, “I am late. But I was so busy! Pray forgive me and permit me to have a pretty coat like the others.”

“You are late indeed,” said the Father reproachfully, “and all the coloring has been done. You should have come when I bade you. Do you not know that it is the prompt bird who fares best? My rainbow color-box has been generously used, and I have but little of each tint left. Yet I will paint you with the colors that I have, and if the result be ill you have only yourself to blame.”

“The Father smiled gently as He took up the brush which He had laid down, and dipped it in the first color which came to hand. This He used until there was no more, when He began with another shade, and so continued until the Goldfinch was completely colored from head to foot. Such a gorgeous coat! His forehead and throat were of the most brilliant crimson. His cap and sailor collar were black. His back was brown and yellow, his breast white, his wings golden set off with velvet black, and his tail was black with white-tipped feathers. Certainly there was no danger of his being mistaken for any other bird.

When the Goldfinch looked down into a pool and saw the reflection of his gorgeous coat, he burst out into a song of joy. “I like it, oh I like it!” he warbled, and his song was very sweet. “Oh, I am glad that I was late, indeed I am, dear Father!”

But the kind Father sighed and shook His head as He put away the brush, exclaiming, “Poor little Goldfinch! You are indeed a beautiful bird. But I fear that the gorgeous coat which you wear, and which is the best that I could give you, because you came so late, will cause you more sorrow than joy. Because of it you will be chased and captured and kept in captivity; and your life will be spent in mourning for the days when you were a plain gray bird.”

The Curious Book of Birds.

Written by Abbie Farwell Brown.

Illustrations by E. Boyd Smith.

Houghton, Mifflin & Company: Boston & New York. 1903.

Jimmie Dressed Up To Make Believe He Is A Lady Going Calling!

Sister's-Jimmie-Piggy-The-Tale-Of-Jimmie-Piggy-SQ

Jimmie decides he does not like being a lady!

“Just the thing!” he cried. “I’ll dress up and make believe to be a lady going calling.”

So he dressed up in his sister’s clothes and went for a walk as far as the meadow, where he plucked a handful of daisies.

“I don’t like being a lady,” said Jimmie, “for I can’t make any noise.”

So he ran back to the house and threw off his fine clothes.

“I’ll play soldier,” he said, “and beat my drum, and make lots of noise.

Illustration:  Jimmie's Sister's Clothes.  Sister's-Jimmie-Piggy-The-Tale-Of-Jimmie-Piggy.jpg

The Tale of Jimmie Piggy

By Marjorie Manners.

The Platt & Nourse Co.: New York. 1918.

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

Illustration:  St. Patrick's Day from A YEAR WITH THE FAIRIES. Written by Anna M. Scott. Illustrations by M. T. Ross. Published by P. F. Volland & Co.: Chicago. 1914.

Oberon’s Edict on St. Patrick’s Day

Observe, my Sprites, St. Patrick’s Day,

And wear a knot of green to-day,

Pay deference due the Emerald Isle

In shamrock frocks of latest style.

A YEAR WITH THE FAIRIES.

Written by Anna M. Scott.

Illustrations by M. T. Ross.

Published by P. F. Volland & Co.: Chicago. 1914.

1,000 Animals Give Up Their Fur!

Illustration:  From the story Furball.  ONCE UPON A TIME - A BOOK OF OLD-TIME FAIRY TALES.  Edited by Katharine Lee Bates.  Illustrated by Margaret Evans Price.  Rand McNally & Company: Chicago & New York. 1921.

FURBALL

“. . . I shall want, besides, a coat made of a thousand different kinds of fur.  Every animal in the kingdom must give a part of his skin to make that coat.”

ONCE UPON A TIME – A BOOK OF OLD-TIME FAIRY TALES.

From the Story “Furball.”

Edited by Katharine Lee Bates.

Illustrated by Margaret Evans Price.

Rand McNally & Company: Chicago & New York. 1921.

Illustration:  From the story Furball.  ONCE UPON A TIME - A BOOK OF OLD-TIME FAIRY TALES.  Edited by Katharine Lee Bates.  Illustrated by Margaret Evans Price.  Rand McNally & Company: Chicago & New York. 1921.

Curious Crocodiles Beside The River Nile!

Illustration by Harry B. Neilson: "A Curious Sight" from Peter Piper's Peep-Show

“A Curious Sight”

. . . But wait until you’ve heard me tell

About my Crocodile.

And then I think that you’ll agree

You didn’t know such things could be

Beside the river Nile.

He wore a coat of brilliant hue,

He’d trousers and a waistcoat, too;

Upon his head a hat;

His gloves were of the latest shade,

A neat umbrella he displayed –

Now, what do you think of that?

But even as I gazed in awe,

A stranger figure still I saw –

It would have made you smile –

For there approached with gown so neat,

With hat and feathers all complete,

A Lady Crocodile!

They greeted one another, then

Went arm in arm across the plain

Beside the river Nile.

I’ve searched, but ah! I’ve searched in vain,

I’ve never seen a trace again

Of either Crocodile!

PETER PIPER’S PEEP SHOW or All the Fun of the Fair

By S. H. Hamer

With Illustrations By: Lewis Baumer and Harry B. Neilson

Cassell And Company, Ltd.: London, Paris, New York & Melbourne.  1906.