Disgusting Dinner Party!

Rats-at-Dinner-Dot's-Picture-Book

“The Rats and Mice Eating Up The King’s dinner.

The King bought most of the ship’s cargo, and invited the Captain to dinner, which was no sooner served than out rushed a great number of rats and mice, and ate it up. “Oh!” said the Captain, “we’ll soon stop this!” and proceeded to the ship to fetch Pussy, while another dinner was being prepared. When the second meal was served, Pussy soon put an end to the troublesome visitors. This so pleased the King, that he sent Dick a chest of gold and jewels in exchange for the cat.

Illustration:  Rats and Mice at King's Table.  Dot’s Picture Book  Illustrations by: F. M. Barton, E. Heatly, N. Westrup & S. Carter.  Dean & Son, Ltd.: London. Ca 1908.

. . . Dick had to sleep in the garret, which was overrun with rats and mice; so, one day, as he was going on an errand for his young mistress he met a girl with a cat under her arm, and he gave her a penny for it.

All the servants were one day called into the office of the Merchant, and were told their master was going to send a ship out to the East, and that he would allow each to have a venture therein.

Each servant sent something, but poor Dick had only a cat, which was sent.

When the vessel had been some time out at sea, the Captain steered her on to the coast of Barbary.

The King bought most of the ship’s cargo, and invited the Captain to dinner, which was no sooner served than out rushed a great number of rats and mice, and ate it up. “Oh!” said the Captain, “we’ll soon stop this!” and proceeded to the ship to fetch Pussy, while another dinner was being prepared. When the second meal was served, Pussy soon put an end to the troublesome visitors. This so pleased the King, that he sent Dick a chest of gold and jewels in exchange for the cat.

 

From the story “Dick Whittington.”

Dot’s Picture Book

Illustrations by: F. M. Barton, E. Heatly, N. Westrup & S. Carter.

Dean & Son, Ltd.: London. Ca 1908.

 

 

 

Bad on Earth!

Illustration: Billy in Grocery Store. Billy Whiskers In An Aeroplane. Written by Frances Trego Montgomery. Illustrations by Constance White. The Saalfield Publishing Company: Chicago - Akron, Ohio - New York. 1912.

AFTER EATING EVERYTHING IN THE EATABLE LINE, HE STUCK HIS HEAD IN A BARREL OF MOLASSES.

Dick related how Billy got into mischief every single place he landed, until he told him that if he got into any more, the next place they stopped he would tie him up. This threat was enough to make Billy behave, for if there was one thing he hated more than any other, it was to be tied up; Billy must be free to roam if he wanted to be happy.

At one place Billy had run into a grocery store, and after upsetting things generally and eating everything he came across in the eatable line, he had stuck his head in a barrel of molasses and got his beard all sticky, which he had afterwards tried to lick off. In fact, he had nearly fallen out of the biplane, having forgotten to hold on.

“I do hope my watchman will look after him, though,” said Dick, “for if he don’t, Billy surely will go roving and get lost or stolen, and I should hate to have anything happen to him, for he certainly is a great deal of company away up there in the clouds.”

Illustration:  Billy in Grocery Store.  Billy Whiskers In An Aeroplane.  Written by Frances Trego Montgomery.  Illustrations by Constance White.  The Saalfield Publishing Company: Chicago - Akron, Ohio - New York. 1912.

Billy Whiskers In An Aeroplane.

Written by Frances Trego Montgomery.

Illustrations by Constance White.

The Saalfield Publishing Company: Chicago – Akron, Ohio – New York. 1912.

Chinese New Year!

Illustration:  Chinese New Year from Kids of Many Colors

“New Year’s Day, China”

Pitter, patter, through the street,

Cling-a-ling, long;

Fire crackers, children,

And lantern song.

February’s rather late –

Bim-a-bam, bin! –

But the bells are bringing

The new year in.

Kids of Many Colors

By Grace Duffie Boylan and Ike Morgan

Hurst and Company Publishers: New York. 1909.