Collie From Scotland!

Illustration:  Collie.  Our Dear Dogs.  Father Tuck’s Happy Hour Series.  Raphael Tuck & Sons, Ltd.: London-Paris-Berlin-New York-Montreal. Printed in the Fine Art Works in Saxony.  Publishers to Their Majesties The King & Queen, & Her Majesty Queen Alexandra. Ca 1910.

“Scott, the Collie.”

 Now we come to a very different sort of dog. Scott came from Scotland last January, and is a handsome, princely dog. He comes of a very good family and has a pedigree a yard long, which means that he can tell you who his ancestors were for years and years.

Although he is very proud he is not above making himself useful, and in the picture you see him carrying a basket of apples. Indeed, he is very fond of carrying something, when out for a walk, such as a stick or an umbrella.

Our Dear Dogs.

Father Tuck’s Happy Hour Series.

Raphael Tuck & Sons, Ltd.: London-Paris-Berlin-New York-Montreal. Printed in the Fine Art Works in Saxony.

Publishers to Their Majesties The King & Queen, & Her Majesty Queen Alexandra. Ca 1910.

Escape 1906 San Francisco Earthquake!

Oakland-Earthquake-Billy-Whiskers-&-Fiends

Illustration: Escape San Francisco Earthquake 1906.  Billy Whiskers, Jr. and His Chums. By Frances Trego Montgomery. Illustrated by Hugo von Hofsten. The Saalfield, Publishing Company:  Chicago, Akron, Ohio & New York.  1907.

San Francisco to Oakland to Sacramento!

“Let us cross the bay to Oakland as soon as we can. Perhaps the quake will not run under the bay and we will be safe if we can reach Oakland.”  And the three ran down the street keeping together this time, for they knew every-one was too excited to pay attention to them.

———-

“All aboard for Sacramento and the far east,” called the conductor, as he swung himself onto the train as it moved slowly out of the depot.

“Now,” said Billy, “we must follow the track the train is on until we get out of the city and then we will be all right, for there will be only one track running east.

 

Billy Whiskers, Jr. and His Chums.

By Frances Trego Montgomery.

Illustrated by Hugo von Hofsten.

The Saalfield, Publishing Company: Chicago, Akron, Ohio & New York. 1907.

Now Is Your Time To See Our Great Show!

Their-Pictures-Billy-W-Aeroplane

THERE THEY SAW LARGE PICTURES OF THEMSELVES – THE THREE FAMOUS ANIMALS WHO TRAVELED IN THE AEROPLANE RACE.

Billy Whiskers In An Aeroplane.

Written by Frances Trego Montgomery.

Illustrations by Constance White.

The Saalfield Publishing Company: Chicago – Akron, Ohio – New York. 1912.

Dog Dentures!

Illustration:  Dog Dentures.  Peck’s Bad Boy and His Pa.  Written by George W. Peck.  Illustrated by True Williams.  W. B. Conkey Company. 1900.

“HE LOOKED JUST LIKE PA WHEN HE TRIED TO SMILE.”

“O, about the teeth. That was too bad. You see my chum has got a dog that is old, and his teeth have all come out in front, and this morning I borrowed Pa’s teeth before he got up, to see if we couldn’t fix them in the dog’s mouth, so he could eat better. Pa says it is evidence of a kind heart for a boy to be good to dumb animals, but it is a darned mean dog that will go back on a friend. We tied the teeth in the dog’s mouth with a string that went around his upper jaw, and another around his under jaw, and you’d a dide to see how funny he looked when he laffed. He looked just like Pa when he tried to smile so as to get me to come up to him so he can lick me. The dog pawed his mouth a spell to get the teeth out, and then we gave him a bone with some meat on, and he began to gnaw the bone, and the teeth come off the plate, and he thought it was pieces of the bone, and he swallowed the teeth.

Peck’s Bad Boy and His Pa.

Written by George W. Peck.

Illustrated by True Williams.

W. B. Conkey Company. 1900.

Puppy – A Bone As Big As Himself!

Illustration:  Our Dear Dogs  Father Tuck’s Happy Hour Series  Raphael Tuck & Sons, Ltd.: London-Paris-Berlin-New York-Montreal. Printed in the Fine Art Works in Saxony.  Publishers to Their Majesties The King & Queen, & Her Majesty Queen Alexandra. Ca 1910.

“Ethel’s Puppy”

Now, what do you think of Cousin Ethel’s little foxterrier. From the very moment that his eyes opened and he could waddle about, he was in trouble, and that has continued ever since. His name is Scamp, which suits him very well, and he is four months old next Thursday.

Last Monday he distinguished himself by stealing a bone nearly as big as himself. Cook had something to say to this, and Scamp still feels very sore, but he is friendly with Cook all the same: he thinks it best to keep in with her.

Our Dear Dogs

Father Tuck’s Happy Hour Series

Raphael Tuck & Sons, Ltd.: London-Paris-Berlin-New York-Montreal. Printed in the Fine Art Works in Saxony.

Publishers to Their Majesties The King & Queen, & Her Majesty Queen Alexandra. Ca 1910.

Little Tom Tinker’s Dog!

Bow-Wow-Wow-Mother-G-Volland-SQ

Bow, wow, wow!

Whose dog art thou?

Little Tom Tinker’s dog,

Bow, wow, wow!

Illustration:  Bow Wow Wow.  Mother Goose - Volland Popular Edition.  Edited by Eulalie Osgood Grover.  Illustrated by Frederick Richardson.  Published by P. F. Volland Company: New York, Chicago & Toronto. 1921.

Mother Goose – Volland Popular Edition.

Edited by Eulalie Osgood Grover.

Illustrated by Frederick Richardson.

Published by P. F. Volland Company: New York, Chicago & Toronto. 1921.

Tomato Sauce!

Tomato-Sauce-Billy-Bounce-Small

“Come, now, don’t give me any of your tomato sauce.”

. . . “A boy threw my favorite sister at a cat last week and I have never been able to abide boys since; and, come to think of it you look like that boy.”

“Oh! no, sir, it wasn’t I,” said Billy, frightened. “I – I’ve only just come.”

. . . hundreds of other tomatoes, not quite so large as the first one it is true, but large enough to frighten Billy, were shaking their heads at him threateningly.

But Billy plucked up his courage and said in a voice that was a wee bit shaky, “Come, now, don’t give me any of your tomato sauce; if you’re not careful I’ll squash you.”

Illustration:  Tomato Sauce.  Billy Bounce  By W. W. Denslow and Dudley A Bragdon.  Pictures by Denslow.  G. W. Dillingham Co. Publishers: New York. 1906.

Billy Bounce

By W. W. Denslow and Dudley A Bragdon.

Pictures by Denslow.

G. W. Dillingham Co. Publishers: New York. 1906.

Rather Nervous!

Illustration:  PETER PIPER’S PEEP SHOW or All the Fun of the Fair.  Written by S. H. Hamer.  Illustrations by Lewis Baumer and Harry B. Neilson.  Cassell And Company, Ltd.: London, Paris, New York & Melbourne. 1906.

“They were all rather nervous.”

. . . just at that moment a voice from behind the fence said, “Well my goodness gracious! Pretty goings on, I must say!  Pepper-and-Salt come down this very minute, or I’ll know the reason why!”

They did come down, but not exactly as they had intended to do, for they all tumbled flop in a heap on the floor, amid squeals and howls from the audience.

PETER PIPER’S PEEP SHOW or All the Fun of the Fair

Written by S. H. Hamer.

Illustrations by Lewis Baumer and Harry B. Neilson.

Cassell And Company, Ltd.: London, Paris, New York & Melbourne. 1906.

Hunters Find A Baby In The Forest!

Illustration from the story Valentine and Orson.  The Three Bears’ Picture Book.  Illustrated by Walter Crane.  George Routledge and Sons: London & New York.

Now, Pepin chanced that very day to hunt with all his train

In that same wood, and found the child ere she came back again;

And took him home, and brought him up, and gave him all the things fine –

Apparel, horses, and a name, – so he was Valentine.

And brave and fair he grew, – King Pepin’s daughter loved him well;

The sons were jealous. Now will I his brother’s story tell.

From the story Valentine and Orson.

The Three Bears’ Picture Book.

Illustrated by Walter Crane.

George Routledge and Sons: London & New York.

How To Build a Bumble Dragon!

Illustration:  Bumble Dragon.  From the Story “THE BUMBLE DRAGON”  Billy Popgun  Written and Illustrated by Milo Winter.  Houghton Mifflin Company: Boston & New York. 1912.

“THE BUMBLE DRAGON” 

All at once he came to an open place with huge rocks in it, and right in the middle lay an enormous Dragon.

He was sound asleep and snoring in a low rumble, every now and then coming to a very loud snort, and mumbling afterward.

Billy took a good long look at him. His body looked like a gigantic lizard with a long snake’s tail. His large webbed feet had claws like an eagle. But his head! Oh! What a funny head he had. It looked like a cow’s head, only there were scales on it, and a lion’s mane, and dog’s ears. Billy was just beginning to wonder why he was called a Bumble Dragon when he saw the great transparent wings of a Bumble Bee folded over his back.

From the Story “THE BUMBLE DRAGON”

Billy Popgun

Written and Illustrated by Milo Winter.

Houghton Mifflin Company: Boston & New York. 1912.

Terrible Creatures!

Illustration:  John, the Bull-Dog Puppy.  Our Dear Dogs  Father Tuck’s Happy Hour Series  Raphael Tuck & Sons, Ltd.: London-Paris-Berlin-New York-Montreal. Printed in the Fine Art Works in Saxony.  Publishers to Their Majesties The King & Queen, & Her Majesty Queen Alexandra. Ca 1910.

“John, the Bull-Dog Puppy.”

John belongs to my brother. He is not beautiful but is kind-hearted and good-tempered. My brother says bull-dogs are not half so bad as they look, which I think is a good thing, for some of them look terrible creatures, and I always feel inclined to cross over the way when I see one coming.

 

Our Dear Dogs

Father Tuck’s Happy Hour Series

Raphael Tuck & Sons, Ltd.: London-Paris-Berlin-New York-Montreal. Printed in the Fine Art Works in Saxony.

Publishers to Their Majesties The King & Queen, & Her Majesty Queen Alexandra. Ca 1910.

 

 

We Won’t Let Him Mix With the Other Dog!

Illustration: Our Dear Dogs Father Tuck’s Happy Hour Series Raphael Tuck & Sons, Ltd.: London-Paris-Berlin-New York-Montreal. Printed in the Fine Art Works in Saxony. Publishers to Their Majesties The King & Queen, & Her Majesty Queen Alexandra. Ca 1910.

Jim, the Foxterrier.  “Tubbing Time.”

Jim is very young. He belongs to the coachman’s son. He is a careless dog and never looks where he is going. If there is a mud puddle about, he is sure to fall into it. If there is a sack of coal in the yard, Jim is sure to rub against it, so Jim is usually very dirty, and as we won’t let him mix with the other dogs unless he is clean, he has to be washed every other day, which makes him very sorrowful.

Our Dear Dogs

Father Tuck’s Happy Hour Series

Raphael Tuck & Sons, Ltd.: London-Paris-Berlin-New York-Montreal. Printed in the Fine Art Works in Saxony.

Publishers to Their Majesties The King & Queen, & Her Majesty Queen Alexandra. Ca 1910.

Beppo – Owner Likes Poodle’s Tricks But Not His Temperament!

Illustration:  Our Dear Dogs  Father Tuck’s Happy Hour Series  Raphael Tuck & Sons, Ltd.:  London-Paris-Berlin-New York-Montreal.  Printed in the Fine Art Works in Saxony.  Publishers to Their Majesties The King & Queen, & Her Majesty Queen Alexandra.  Ca 1910.

“Beppo, the Poodle.”

Now I come to a very remarkable dog, and that is Beppo, the French Poodle. I could write a whole book about Beppo.

Do you know he has to go to a dog barber to be shaved, and this cost quite a lot of money. Poodles, when they are not shaved, have long hair all over their bodies that nearly touches the ground.

Beppo is wonderfully clever. He will stand on his head when he is told; he will also pretend to be dead, and if the piano is played to him he will dance round the room on his hind legs, turning round all the time as if he were waltzing.

Beppo will jump through a hoop, and can do this backwards although it is very difficult. When he has finished his tricks, he expects a lump of sugar as a reward.

I am sorry to say he is not a good-tempered dog, and none of the other dogs like him, which is a great trouble, for there is always the danger of a fight. For this reason I believe Beppo is going to leave us shortly.

Our Dear Dogs

Father Tuck’s Happy Hour Series.

Raphael Tuck & Sons, Ltd.: London-Paris-Berlin-New York-Montreal. Printed in the Fine Art Works in Saxony.

Publishers to Their Majesties The King & Queen, & Her Majesty Queen Alexandra. Ca 1910.

Billy Chews a Cue!

Illustration:  Billy Whiskers, Jr. and His Chums  By Frances Trego Montgomery.  Illustrated by Hugo von Hofsten.  The Saalfield, Publishing Company: Chicago, Akron, Ohio & New York. 1907.

Billy Wipes Out Old Scores

He would walk up and chew the pig-tail off the Chinaman’s head, as he would a straw rope. This would be the worst punishment he could possibly inflict on the Chinaman, and would wipe out old scores.

But what if his rope would not be long enough to reach the sleeping Chinaman. He advanced cautiously, and, oh joy! It would just allow him to touch the Chinaman’s head, and he could chew the cue off close to the scalp, which would make the man more angry than ever.

At first Billy chewed slowly and cautiously for fear of waking the Chinaman, but he soon saw he need have no fear. He was not to be awakened even by a thunder-bolt.

Billy Whiskers, Jr. and His Chums

By Frances Trego Montgomery.

Illustrated by Hugo von Hofsten.

The Saalfield, Publishing Company: Chicago, Akron, Ohio & New York. 1907.

A Flying Fried Egg!

Illustration:   Billy Bounce By W. W. Denslow and Dudley A Bragdon. Pictures by Denslow. G. W. Dillingham Co. Publishers:  New York.  1906.

“Why it is, a large fried egg,” said Billy, excitedly.”

Billy Bounce.

By W. W. Denslow and Dudley A Bragdon.

Pictures by Denslow.

G. W. Dillingham Co. Publishers: New York. 1906.

Illustration:  Billy Bounce  by W. W. Denslow and Dudley A Bragdon.  Pictures by Denslow.  G. W. Dillingham Co. Publishers: New York. 1906.

“Why it is, a large fried egg,” said Billy, excitedly.”

To the cat we are large uneatable prey!

Illustration from Our Friend The Dog With CatEdit

. . . I do not speak of the cat, to whom we are nothing more than a too large and uneatable prey: the ferocious cat, whose sidelong contempt tolerates us only as encumbering parasites in our own homes.

Billy is not a Stink Pot – Polly Attacked!

Illustration from Billy Whiskers in the Movies
“Billy was hoping he could swing the cage so far it would turn upside down and spill Miss. Polly out.”
Billy Whiskers in the Movies.
By Frances Trego Montgomery.
Illustrated by Paul Hawthorne.
The Saafield Publishing Company: Akron, Ohio and New York. 1921.

“Polly, seeing she was safe, began to screech again, but only got as far as ‘Stink p-o-t!’ When with a bound Billy was after her again, and this time as he ran he gave a jump and bounded up high enough to knock the cage off its hook . . .”

“Once Bitten, Twice Shy” – Dogs and Mustard!

Illustration:  "Once Bitten, Twice Shy." From:
“Once Bitten, Twice Shy.”
Mary Had a Little Lamb and Other Good Stories.
Henry Altemus Company: Philadelphia. 1906.

A burnt dog dreads the mustard pot;

However you may try

To coax him, he will taste it not –

Once bitten is twice shy.

The Poor Dog Had None!

Illustration by Walter Crane: Old Mother Hubbard and her Dog
Mother Hubbard
Walter Crane’s Picture Books
John Lane
The Bodley Head: London & New York. 1897.

Old Mother Hubbard

Went to the cupboard

To get her poor Dog a bone;

But when she came there

The cupboard was bare,

And so the poor Dog had none.

 

All The Bric-A-Brac in Motion.

Illustration: "all the bric-a-brac in motion."  Illustrator:  Maria L. Kirk from the Nurnberg Stove by Louisa de la Rame.
“For what he saw was nothing less than all the bric-a-brac in motion.”
The Nurnberg Stove by Louisa de la Rame
Illustrated by Maria L. Kirk
J. B. Lippincott Company: Philadelphia and London. 1916.

Midnight was once more chiming from all the brazen tongues of the city when he awoke, and, all being still around him, ventured to put his head out of the brass door of the stove to see why such a strange bright light was round him.

It was a very strange and brilliant light indeed; and yet, what is perhaps still stranger, it did not frighten or amaze him, nor did what he saw alarm him either, and yet I think it would have done you or me. For what he saw was nothing less than all the bric-a-brac in motion.

 

Billy Whiskers and the Baboon, Monkey & Dog Firemen

Illustration:  Billy Whiskers in the Movies
“Billy, in black trousers and red jacket, a helmet on his head, guided the ponies drawing the fire engine.”
Billy Whiskers in the Movies.
By Frances Trego Montgomery.
Illustrated by Paul Hawthorne.
The Saalfield Publishing Company: Akron, Ohio and New York. 1921.

“Consequently in a jiffy they had Billy dressed in black trousers and red jacket, with a big, black helmet on is head.  Then he was told to jump on the front seat of the beautiful little brand new fire engine that was shining like gold.  He was told to sit down and let his fore legs stick out like arms, and to them fastened the reins.  It looked as if Billy was guiding the ponies, but in reality he was only holding the reins, for the ponies had been taught just what to do and where to go.”