The Old Woman Never Told Lies!

Woman-Mother-Goose-Volland-SQ

There was an old woman lived under the hill,

And if she’s not gone she lives there still.

Baked apples she sold, and cranberry pies,

And she’s the old woman that never told lies.

Illustration:  Old Woman.  Mother Goose Volland Popular Edition.  Edited by Eulalie Osgood Grover.  Illustrated by Frederick Richardson.  Published by P. F. Volland Company: New York, Chicago & Toronto. 1921.

Mother Goose Volland Popular Edition.

Edited by Eulalie Osgood Grover.

Illustrated by Frederick Richardson.

Published by P. F. Volland Company: New York, Chicago & Toronto. 1921.

 

Escape 1906 San Francisco Earthquake!

Oakland-Earthquake-Billy-Whiskers-&-Fiends

Illustration: Escape San Francisco Earthquake 1906.  Billy Whiskers, Jr. and His Chums. By Frances Trego Montgomery. Illustrated by Hugo von Hofsten. The Saalfield, Publishing Company:  Chicago, Akron, Ohio & New York.  1907.

San Francisco to Oakland to Sacramento!

“Let us cross the bay to Oakland as soon as we can. Perhaps the quake will not run under the bay and we will be safe if we can reach Oakland.”  And the three ran down the street keeping together this time, for they knew every-one was too excited to pay attention to them.

———-

“All aboard for Sacramento and the far east,” called the conductor, as he swung himself onto the train as it moved slowly out of the depot.

“Now,” said Billy, “we must follow the track the train is on until we get out of the city and then we will be all right, for there will be only one track running east.

 

Billy Whiskers, Jr. and His Chums.

By Frances Trego Montgomery.

Illustrated by Hugo von Hofsten.

The Saalfield, Publishing Company: Chicago, Akron, Ohio & New York. 1907.

Pa Grabs Cat By Neck – Cat Attacks!

Illustration:  Tom Cat.  Peck’s Bad Boy and His Pa.  Written by George W. Peck.  Illustrated by True Williams.  W. B. Conkey Company. 1900.

“PA’S SHIRT WAS NO PROTECTION AT ALL.”

Oh, my ! I think Pa took the tom cat right by the neck, the way he does me, and that left all the cat’s feet free to get to their work. By the way the cat squalled as though it was being choked, I know Pa had him by the neck.

Illustration:  Tom Cat.  Illustration:  Tom Cat.  Peck’s Bad Boy and His Pa.  Written by George W. Peck.  Illustrated by True Williams.  W. B. Conkey Company. 1900

Peck’s Bad Boy and His Pa.

Written by George W. Peck.

Illustrated by True Williams.

W. B. Conkey Company. 1900.

Now Is Your Time To See Our Great Show!

Their-Pictures-Billy-W-Aeroplane

THERE THEY SAW LARGE PICTURES OF THEMSELVES – THE THREE FAMOUS ANIMALS WHO TRAVELED IN THE AEROPLANE RACE.

Billy Whiskers In An Aeroplane.

Written by Frances Trego Montgomery.

Illustrations by Constance White.

The Saalfield Publishing Company: Chicago – Akron, Ohio – New York. 1912.

Rather Nervous!

Illustration:  PETER PIPER’S PEEP SHOW or All the Fun of the Fair.  Written by S. H. Hamer.  Illustrations by Lewis Baumer and Harry B. Neilson.  Cassell And Company, Ltd.: London, Paris, New York & Melbourne. 1906.

“They were all rather nervous.”

. . . just at that moment a voice from behind the fence said, “Well my goodness gracious! Pretty goings on, I must say!  Pepper-and-Salt come down this very minute, or I’ll know the reason why!”

They did come down, but not exactly as they had intended to do, for they all tumbled flop in a heap on the floor, amid squeals and howls from the audience.

PETER PIPER’S PEEP SHOW or All the Fun of the Fair

Written by S. H. Hamer.

Illustrations by Lewis Baumer and Harry B. Neilson.

Cassell And Company, Ltd.: London, Paris, New York & Melbourne. 1906.

Big Pussy!

Illustration:  Cat & Mice.  Mother Goose’s Nursery Rhymes.  McLoughlin Brothers: New York. Ca 1900.

Pussy & Mice

Some little mice sat in a barn to spin,

Pussy came by, and she popped her head in;

“Shall I come in and cut your threads off?”

“Oh no, kind sir, you will snap our heads off.”

Mother Goose’s Nursery Rhymes.

McLoughlin Brothers: New York. Ca 1900.

Not Good For Any Known Dish, When You Are Dead!

Illustration:  The Cat and The Hare.  Tiny and Her Vanity.  McLoughlin Bros.: New York. 1892.

THE CAT AND THE HARE.

“Puss, puss!” said Tiny, going up to the sleeping beauty, “good morning to you.”  “Oh, good morning; how are you?” replied Puss, “I really did not see you, for I was half asleep after being up all night at a mouse party.”

“Indeed,” said Tiny, “was it amusing?”  “Yes, to me,” said the Cat slyly, with a very slight wink, “not to them.”  “Ah!  I understand,” said Tiny.  “Oh, Puss, Puss!”  “Did you call me?” said a pert young Hare, peeping out from under a large leaved plant.  “You,”  said the Cat, looking down with contempt – “you, Puss.”  “Yes, indeed, I am called Puss in the highest circles,” sharply replied the Hare.

“You are a gipsey, a mere country tramp,” replied the Cat, “without any claim to honest Cat-hood; where is your tail, friend?  Cat, indeed!”  “Tail! Pooh!” said the Hare, “that would be of very little use to me, but just look at my lovely ears; pray, where are yours?”  The Cat did not deign to reply, but rubbed her nose with her paw.

You talk to me!” said the Hare, pertly.  “I, who am sought after by the highest people in the land, and am often at their tables!  I live at large on my own estate, as good a gentleman as any of them; whilst you, are a short-eared, long-tailed servant, living upon the mice, or anything, you can catch; and not good for any known dish, when you are dead!  Ha, ha, ha!  Puss, indeed!  You are a mouse trap.”  So saying, he struck his foot smartly upon the ground, and trotted away.

Tiny and Her Vanity.

McLoughlin Bros.: New York. 1892.

Billy Chews a Cue!

Illustration:  Billy Whiskers, Jr. and His Chums  By Frances Trego Montgomery.  Illustrated by Hugo von Hofsten.  The Saalfield, Publishing Company: Chicago, Akron, Ohio & New York. 1907.

Billy Wipes Out Old Scores

He would walk up and chew the pig-tail off the Chinaman’s head, as he would a straw rope. This would be the worst punishment he could possibly inflict on the Chinaman, and would wipe out old scores.

But what if his rope would not be long enough to reach the sleeping Chinaman. He advanced cautiously, and, oh joy! It would just allow him to touch the Chinaman’s head, and he could chew the cue off close to the scalp, which would make the man more angry than ever.

At first Billy chewed slowly and cautiously for fear of waking the Chinaman, but he soon saw he need have no fear. He was not to be awakened even by a thunder-bolt.

Billy Whiskers, Jr. and His Chums

By Frances Trego Montgomery.

Illustrated by Hugo von Hofsten.

The Saalfield, Publishing Company: Chicago, Akron, Ohio & New York. 1907.

To the cat we are large uneatable prey!

Illustration from Our Friend The Dog With CatEdit

. . . I do not speak of the cat, to whom we are nothing more than a too large and uneatable prey: the ferocious cat, whose sidelong contempt tolerates us only as encumbering parasites in our own homes.

“When I Have Eaten My Cat.”

Illustration: "The Miller Gave His Cat to His Youngest Son."  PUSS IN BOOTS.  Illustrated by:  Mary Hamilton Fry.  Fairy Tales Every Child Should Know

“THE MILLER GAVE HIS CAT TO HIS YOUNGEST SON.”

There was a miller who had three sons, and when he died he divided what he possessed among them in the following manner:  He gave the mill to the eldest, his ass to the second, and his cat to the youngest. . . The poor young fellow who had nothing but the cat complained that he was hardly used:  “My brothers,” said he, “by joining their stocks together may do well in the world, but for me, when I have eaten my cat and made a fur cap of his skin, I may soon die of hunger!”

From the story PUSS IN BOOTS

By: Charles Perrault

Fairy Tales Every Child Should Know

Edited by: Hamilton Wright Mabie

Illustrated by: Mary Hamilton Fry

George Sully & Company: New York. 1915.

Billy is not a Stink Pot – Polly Attacked!

Illustration from Billy Whiskers in the Movies
“Billy was hoping he could swing the cage so far it would turn upside down and spill Miss. Polly out.”
Billy Whiskers in the Movies.
By Frances Trego Montgomery.
Illustrated by Paul Hawthorne.
The Saafield Publishing Company: Akron, Ohio and New York. 1921.

“Polly, seeing she was safe, began to screech again, but only got as far as ‘Stink p-o-t!’ When with a bound Billy was after her again, and this time as he ran he gave a jump and bounded up high enough to knock the cage off its hook . . .”