They Tumbled In Like This!

Illustration: The animals of Zoo-land Animal Antics By Louis Wain Illustration by Matthews. S. W. Partridge & Co: London. Ca 1900-1910.

. . . But their heavy weights upon the ice, it grieves me to relate,

Were more than it could bear, and so they tumbled in like this!

.

Animal Antics

By Louis Wain

Illustration by Matthews.

S. W. Partridge & Co: London. Ca 1900-1910.

My Funny Little House!

Illustration:  Funny Little House.  The Funny Little Book.  Story and Illustrations by Johnny Gruelle.  P. F. Volland Company: New York, Chicago and Toronto. 1918.

“Yes, this is my funny little house, funny little man!” said the funny little lady. “Will you come into my funny little house and have a funny little cup of tea, funny little man?”

 

The Funny Little Book.

Story and Illustrations by Johnny Gruelle.

P. F. Volland Company: New York, Chicago and Toronto. 1918.

 

Lady Spring & Pan!

Lady-Spring-A-Year-With-The-Fairies-SQ

Lady Spring

O Lady Spring, so sweet and shy,

The whole world smiles when you pass by,

The rippling streamlets dance along

And all the birds burst into song.

 

A flower-embroidered carpet new

Of lovely green is laid for you,

The budding tree, the perfumed air

Bespeak a welcome everywhere.

Illustration:  Lady Spring.  A YEAR WITH THE FAIRIES.  Written by Anna M. Scott.  Illustrations by M. T. Ross.  Published by P. F. Volland & Co.: Chicago. 1914.

A YEAR WITH THE FAIRIES.

Written by Anna M. Scott.

Illustrations by M. T. Ross.

Published by P. F. Volland & Co.: Chicago. 1914.

 

 

Was She Lonely?

Illustration:  The Curious Book of Birds.  Written by Abbie Farwell Brown.  Illustrations by E. Boyd Smith.  Houghton, Mifflin & Company:  Boston & New York. 1903.

Mr. Stork and Miss Heron

. . . “a nice dry house which I should be glad to have you share with me. Come, Miss Heron!  Here I am a lonely old bachelor, and here you are a lonely old maid” –

“Lonely old maid, indeed!” screamed the Heron interrupting him.  “I don’t know what it is to be lonely.  Go along with you!” and she splashed water on him with her wings, she was so indignant.

Poor Mr. Stork felt very crestfallen at this reception of his well-meaning invitation.  He turned about and stalked away towards the nest upon the roof, without so much as saying good-by to the lady.

But no sooner was he out of sight than Miss Heron began to think.  He had said that she was lonely; was she lonely?  Well, perhaps he ought to know better than she, for he was a very wise bird.  Perhaps she was lonely, now that she came to think of it.  However, there was no reason why she should go to live in that stupid, dry, old nest on the house-top.  Why could he not come to dwell in her lovely, mushy-squshy, wady-shady swamp?  That would be pleasant, for he was a good sort of fellow with nice long legs; and there were fish enough in the water for two.  Besides, he could then do the fishing for the family; and, moreover, there would then be two to admire her reflection in the water.  Yes; her mind was made up.  She would invite him.  She glanced down at her reflection and settled some of the feathers which her fit of temper had ruffled out of order.  Then off she started in pursuit of Mr. Stork.

The Curious Book of Birds.

Written by Abbie Farwell Brown.

Illustrations by E. Boyd Smith.

Houghton, Mifflin & Company: Boston & New York. 1903.