Sing From The Heart!

Illustration:  “THE SONG WAS ‘THREE BLIND MICE.’ ”   From the story "The Extraordinary Adventures of Dicker and Me."  Chapter IV. – The Concert – And How Dicker Played a Trick.  PETER PIPER’S PEEP SHOW or All the Fun of the Fair.  Written by S. H. Hamer.  With Illustrations by Lewis Baumer and Harry B. Neilson.  Cassell And Company, Ltd.: London, Paris, New York & Melbourne. 1906.

“THE SONG WAS ‘THREE BLIND MICE.’ ”

 From the story “The Extraordinary Adventures of Dicker and Me.”

Chapter IV. – The Concert – And How Dicker Played a Trick.

PETER PIPER’S PEEP SHOW or All the Fun of the Fair.

Written by S. H. Hamer.

With Illustrations by Lewis Baumer and Harry B. Neilson.

Cassell And Company, Ltd.: London, Paris, New York & Melbourne. 1906.

How Fairies Get There!

Illustration:  The Fairies' Balloon.  A Year With the Fairies.  Written by Anna M. Scott.  Illustrations by M. T. (Penny) Ross.  P. F. Volland & Co.: Chicago, U.S.A. 1914.

The Fairies’ Balloon

The feathery ball of the dandelion gay

Is a silver and white balloon,

It wafts the Fairies clear up to the sky

And they visit the stars and the moon.

.

Sometimes they ride for a night and a day

And sail o’er the billowy main,

And then over mountains and valleys

To their mystical castles in Spain.

.

A Year With the Fairies.

Written by Anna M. Scott.

Illustrations by M. T. (Penny) Ross.

P. F. Volland & Co.: Chicago, U.S.A. 1914.

Not Grumpy Nor Too Gay!

Illustration:  Ranji.  PETER PIPER’S PEEP SHOW or All the Fun of the Fair.  Written by S. H. Hamer.  With Illustrations by Lewis Baumer and Harry B. Neilson.  Cassell And Company, Ltd.: London, Paris, New York & Melbourne. 1906.

“RANJI.”

He has a lovely tenor voice,

So silvery in tone,

Whene’er I hear him sing “My Queen,”

I’m moved to tears, I own.

.

His recitations are renowned,

Both comic ones and sad;

He draws a little, too, and paints –

His paintings are not bad.

.

He plays on several instruments,

The jew’s harp and banjo;

I never stay when he begins,

It irritates me so.

.

His conduct as a husband, too

(He’s married, I should say),

Is everything it out to be,

Not grumpy nor too gay.

.

PETER PIPER’S PEEP SHOW or All the Fun of the Fair.

Written by S. H. Hamer.

With Illustrations by Lewis Baumer and Harry B. Neilson.

Cassell And Company, Ltd.: London, Paris, New York & Melbourne. 1906.

The Fox While You Chase A Bird!

Illustration:  From the Story: “THE BLACKBIRD AND THE FOX”  The Curious Book of Birds.  Written by Abbie Farwell Brown.  Illustrations by E. Boyd Smith.  Houghton, Mifflin & Company: Boston & New York. 1903.

HE MANAGED TO FLUTTER OUT OF REACH.

“Look!” cried one of the women, when she caught sight of him. “Oh, look at the little Blackbird there! His wing is broken and he cannot fly. I shall try to catch him.” And she ran as fast as she could, making her hands into a little cage to put over him. The other women, too, set down their baskets, for convenience–set them down right in the middle of the road–and joined the chase after the poor little Blackbird, so lame, so lame! But always, as they came close to him, he managed to flutter out of reach.

From the Story: “THE BLACKBIRD AND THE FOX”

The Curious Book of Birds.

Written by Abbie Farwell Brown.

Illustrations by E. Boyd Smith.

Houghton, Mifflin & Company: Boston & New York. 1903.

The Loser Beat His Pig!

Illustration:  From the story “The Extraordinary Adventures of Dicker and Me.”  Chapter V. – The Great Race – Won by a Length  PETER PIPER’S PEEP SHOW or All the Fun of the Fair.  Written by S. H. Hamer.  With Illustrations by Lewis Baumer and Harry B. Neilson.  Cassell And Company, Ltd.: London, Paris, New York & Melbourne. 1906.

“Won Easily by a Length”

Slowly they began to creep up – now they were only half a length behind, now they were only a nose behind, now they were level, now they were gaining – now they were ahead! Sandy Jimmy began to get very angry, and pulled out a little whip and started beating Mr. Algernon Daubs Esquire as hard as he could.

That settled it! Mr. Algernon Daubs Esquire was so surprised and angry, and hot and tired, that he gave up directly, and Dicker and Major Porker won easily by a length.

From the story “The Extraordinary Adventures of Dicker and Me.”

Chapter V. – The Great Race – Won by a Length

PETER PIPER’S PEEP SHOW or All the Fun of the Fair.

Written by S. H. Hamer.

With Illustrations by Lewis Baumer and Harry B. Neilson.

Cassell And Company, Ltd.: London, Paris, New York & Melbourne. 1906.

Tennis or What Do They Do That For?

Illustration:  The Jungle Tennis Club.  Animal Antics.  Louis Wain.  S. W. Partridge & Co: London. Ca 1900-1910.

The Jungle Tennis Club.

It was quite a gay company that turned out to the Tennis Match at Jungletown, and as was generally expected Mr. Jimbo came off the winner in the final match with Mr. Leo.

 

Animal Antics.

Louis Wain.

Illustrations by Thomas C. Smith

S. W. Partridge & Co: London. Ca 1900-1910.

Bad at Badminton!

Illustration:  Badminton.  From the story “The Extraordinary Adventures of Dicker and Me.”  PETER PIPER’S PEEP SHOW or All the Fun of the Fair.  Written by S. H. Hamer.  With Illustrations by Lewis Baumer and Harry B. Neilson.  Cassell And Company, Ltd.: London, Paris, New York & Melbourne. 1906.

“I HAD A COMFORTABLE SEAT ON THE WALL.”

 . . . and Dicker sat beside me.

Presently they began, and it was one of the funniest things I ever saw – to watch Augustus Ham jumping up and down trying to hit a shuttlecock; he couldn’t play the least little bit; why, even Major Porker couldn’t help smiling

 

From the story “The Extraordinary Adventures of Dicker and Me.”

PETER PIPER’S PEEP SHOW or All the Fun of the Fair.

Written by S. H. Hamer.

With Illustrations by Lewis Baumer and Harry B. Neilson.

Cassell And Company, Ltd.: London, Paris, New York & Melbourne. 1906.

 

 

Gone Fishing With Jimmie!

Illustration:  Gone Fishing With Jimmie.  The Tale of Jimmie Piggy.  By Marjorie Manners  The Platt & Nourse Co.: New York. 1918.

“I don’t believe there are any fish here, after all,” he said, after half an hour, during which he caught nothing.

No sooner had he said this, than he caught a little sun fish.

Before the morning was half gone, he had enough fish for dinner.

The Tale of Jimmie Piggy.

By Marjorie Manners

The Platt & Nourse Co.: New York. 1918.

Special Paints!

Illustration:  The Portrait Painter.  PETER PIPER’S PEEP SHOW or All the Fun of the Fair.  Written by S. H. Hamer.  With Illustrations by Lewis Baumer and Harry B. Neilson.  Cassell And Company, Ltd.: London, Paris, New York & Melbourne. 1906.

“I WENT OVER TO LOOK AT HIS PAINT-BOX”

“Dear, dear! My lad has put too much carrot in this time.” And he began to mix his paints in a great hurry, while the Lady Pig simpered and smiled, and said.

“Oh, Mr. Daubs, you are a funny fellow!”

When he had finished, I went over to look at his paint-box, for I had never heard of anyone using carrots to paint with before, and I thought he must have made a mistake, and had meant Carmine or Crimson Lake, or Yellow Ochre, or Green Bice, or one of the proper paints; but there it was in a dear little tube, labeled “Finest Carrot,” and there was another tube of “Turnip,” and one of “Mangold-Wurzel,” and one of “Parsnip,” and altogether they were the funniest paints I had ever seen.

 

Story: The Extraordinary Adventures of Dicker and Me.

Chapter III. – The Portrait-Painter.

PETER PIPER’S PEEP SHOW or All the Fun of the Fair.

Written by S. H. Hamer.

With Illustrations by Lewis Baumer and Harry B. Neilson.

Cassell And Company, Ltd.: London, Paris, New York & Melbourne. 1906.

 

Rock An Elephant Baby!

Illustration:  Rocking the Cradle.  THE ADVENTURES OF MOLLIE, WADDY AND TONY.  Written by Paul Waitt.  Illustrations by Clara E. Atwood.  Little, Brown, and Company: Boston. 1915.

“Then he began the business of rocking that cradle.”

A tiny cradle, – it was a real baby’s cradle, – had been placed near the center of the stage. Tony soberly walked up to it and gently laid the baby elephant in the cradle, pulling up the bedclothes with his clever trunk and tenderly covering the baby.

Picking up a match from a table close by, he scratched it, and lit a candle on the table. Then he began the business of rocking the cradle, in such a funny manner that the boys and girls just shrieked with laughter.

 

Chapter XIV.  –  The Elephant Firemen.

THE ADVENTURES OF MOLLIE, WADDY AND TONY.

Written by Paul Waitt.

Illustrations by Clara E. Atwood.

Little, Brown, and Company: Boston. 1915.

 

 

“I Like You Better Than Soup.”

Illustration:  Red Riding Hood Arrives At The Cottage.  Dot’s Picture Book.  Illustrations by: F. M. Barton, E. Heatly, N. Westrup & S. Carter.  Dean & Son, Ltd.: London. Ca 1908.

RED RIDING HOOD ARRIVES AT THE COTTAGE.

“Poor Grannie,” said Red Riding Hood, “I have brought you some soup to make you better.” “Thank you, my dear,” said the Wolf in a weak voice, “I like you better than soup.” “But what large eyes you have Grannie!” said the child. “The better to see you with my dear, said the Wolf with a grin.

 

Dot’s Picture Book.

Illustrations by: F. M. Barton, E. Heatly, N. Westrup & S. Carter.

Dean & Son, Ltd.: London. Ca 1908.

 

 

Dame Trot Loved Her Cat!

Illustration:  Dame Trot.  A Book of Nursery Rhymes.  Arranged by Charles Welsh.  Illustrated by Clara E. Atwood.  D. C. Heath & Co., Publishers: Boston, New York, Chicago. Ca 1901.

Dame Trot and her cat

Led a peaceable life,

When they were not troubled

With other folks’ strife.

When Dame had her dinner

Near Pussy would wait,

And was sure to receive

A nice piece from her plate.

A Book of Nursery Rhymes.

Arranged by Charles Welsh.

Illustrated by Clara E. Atwood.

D. C. Heath & Co., Publishers: Boston, New York, Chicago. Ca 1901.

Smoking and Drinking With Your Dog!

Illustration:  Dog Smoking Pipe.  MOTHER HUBBARD.  Walter Crane’s Picture Books Re-Issue  John Lane  The Bodley Head: London & New York. 1897.

She took a clean dish

To get him some tripe,

But when she came back,

He was smoking a pipe.

She went to the ale-house

To get him some beer,

But when she came back,

The Dog sat in a chair.

 

MOTHER HUBBARD.

Walter Crane’s Picture Books Re-Issue

John Lane

The Bodley Head: London & New York. 1897.

 

Huff And Puff!

Illustration:  Wolf At The Door.  The Story of The Three Little Pigs.  McLoughlin Bro’s: New York. Ca 1900.

Presently a wolf came along and knocked at the door, and said, — “little pig, little pig, let me come in!”

To which the pig answered, — “No, no, by the hair on my chinny-chin-chin!”

This made the wolf angry, and he said, — “Then I’ll huff, and I’ll puff, and I’ll blow your house in!”

 

The Story of The Three Little Pigs.

McLoughlin Bro’s: New York. Ca 1900.

 

 

Mother Goose Flew To The Moon!

Illustration:  Old Mother Goose.  Mother Goose’s Nursery Rhymes.  McLoughlin Brothers: New York. Ca 1900.

“Old Mother Goose.”

And then the gold egg was thrown into the sea,

When Jack he jumped in, and got it back presently.

The knave got the goose, which he vowed he would kill,

Resolving at once his pockets to fill.

Jack’s mother came in, and caught the goose soon,

And mounting its back, flew up to the moon.

 

Mother Goose’s Nursery Rhymes.

McLoughlin Brothers: New York. Ca 1900.

 

 

 

 

Elephant’s Party For Canada Day!

Illustration:  Elephant's Concert. Animal Antics.  Louis Wain.  S. W. Partridge & Co: London. Ca 1900-1910.

The Elephant’s Concert.

Oh! what a noise did those big “boys” make!

They roared till the very roof did shake;

The people laughed loudly at the fun,

Yet they were glad when the “song” was done.

 

Animal Antics.

Louis Wain.

S. W. Partridge & Co: London. Ca 1900-1910.

Old Books & Buns On Sale!

Illustration:  “THE PRACTICAL JOKE.” by Harry B. Neilson.  PETER PIPER’S PEEP SHOW or All the Fun of the Fair.  By: S. H. Hamer.  With Illustrations By: Lewis Baumer and Harry B. Neilson.  Cassell And Company, Ltd.: London, Paris, New York & Melbourne. 1906.

“THE PRACTICAL JOKE.” 

 Little Joey Bun,

He’s the chap for fun,

Sometimes he is really quite provoking.

He’ll always make you laugh,

He’s much too smart by half;

There never seems an end to all his joking.

Father Bun is old –

Joey Bun is bold,

Not a spark of fear in him remaining:

What’s his latest spree?

Well, just look and see.

I don’t think the picture needs explaining.

Illustration:  “THE PRACTICAL JOKE.” by Harry B. Neilson.

PETER PIPER’S PEEP SHOW or All the Fun of the Fair.

By: S. H. Hamer.

With Illustrations By: Lewis Baumer and Harry B. Neilson.

Cassell And Company, Ltd.: London, Paris, New York & Melbourne. 1906.

Please Man!

Illustration:  Straw For A House.  The Story of The Three Little Pigs.  McLoughlin Bro’s: New York. Ca 1900.

. . . met a man with a bundle of straw, and said to him, “Please man, give me that straw to build me a house;” which the man did, and the little pig built a house with it.

The Story of The Three Little Pigs.

McLoughlin Bro’s: New York. Ca 1900.

A Dog’s Life!

Illustration:  OUR FRIEND THE DOG.  By Maurice Maeterlinck.  Illustrated by Cecil Alden.  Dodd, Mead & Company: New York. 1913.

We now, to return to Pelleas, know pretty well what to do and how to behave on the master’s premises. But the world does not end at the house-door, and, beyond the walls and beyond the hedge, there is a universe of which one has not the custody, where one is no longer at home, where relations are changed. How are we to stand in the street, in the fields, in the market-place, in the shops? In consequence of difficult and delicate observations, we understand that we must take no notice of passers-by; obey no calls but the master’s; be polite, with indifference, to strangers who pet us. Next, we must conscientiously fulfill certain obligations of mysterious courtesy toward our brothers the other dogs; respect chickens and ducks; not appear to remark the cakes at the pastry-cook’s, which spread themselves insolently within reach of the tongue; show to the cats, who, on the steps of the houses, provoke us by hideous grimaces, a silent contempt, but one that will not forget; and remember that it is lawful and even commendable to chase and strangle mice, rats, wild rabbits and, generally speaking, all animals (we learn to know them by secret marks) that have not yet made their peace with mankind.

All this and so much more! . . . Was it surprising that Pelleas often appeared pensive in the face of those numberless problems, and that his humble and gentle look was often so profound and grave, laden with cares and full of unreadable questions?

Alas, he did not have time to finish the long and heavy task which nature lays upon the instinct that rises in order to approach a brighter region. . . An ill of a mysterious character, which seems specially to punish the only animal that succeeds in leaving the circle in which it is born; an indefinite ill that carries off hundreds of intelligent little dogs, came and put an end to the destiny and happy education of Pelleas. And now all those efforts to achieve a little more light; all that ardour in loving, that courage in understanding; all that affectionate gaiety and innocent fawning; all those kind and devoted looks, which turned to man to ask for his assistance against unjust death; all those flickering gleams which came from the profound abyss of a world that is no longer ours; all those nearly human little habits lie sadly in the cold ground, under a flowering elder-tree, in a corner of the garden.

Illustration:  OUR FRIEND THE DOG.  By Maurice Maeterlinck.  Illustrated by Cecil Alden.  Dodd, Mead & Company: New York. 1913.

OUR FRIEND THE DOG.

By Maurice Maeterlinck.

Illustrated by Cecil Alden.

Dodd, Mead & Company: New York. 1913.

Miss. Long Legs!

Miss-Long-Legs-Cow-&-Calves

Miss. Long Legs took it at a bound.

“Mercy, see that cow run!” exclaimed the red cow. “The farmer discovered her and set his dogs on her.”

“Land sakes!” exclaimed old Brindle, “she is going to run into that barbed wire fence without seeing it.”

But no, Miss. Long Legs took it at a bound, showing it was not the first fence of the kind she had jumped.

“Oh, what a shame! Just see what a lot of corn she has knocked over and trampled down, dodging those dogs.”

“Here she comes now!” exclaimed the red cow. “Let us be very cool to her to show her we don’t approve of such high-headed, ill-bred manners as one neighbor’s cow stealing corn out of another neighbor’s field.”

COWS AND CALVES.

Written by Frances Trego Montgomery.

Illustrations by Hugo Von Hofsten.

Barse & Hopkins Publishers: New York. 1912.

Happy Flag Day!

Illustration:  Jimmie Piggy & Flag.  The Tale of Jimmie Piggy.  By Marjorie Manners.  The Platt & Nourse Co.: New York. 1918.

He marched around the orchard with his gun over his shoulder, carrying his flag.

“When I grow up,” he said, “I mean to be a great general like I read about in my books. Then I can tell people what to do, and they will have to mind me. Then Mamma can’t say ‘Jimmie don’t do this’ and ‘Jimmie don’t do that.’ And then I can have all the corn I want.”

The Tale of Jimmie Piggy.

By Marjorie Manners.

The Platt & Nourse Co.: New York. 1918.

Illustration:  Jimmie Piggy & Flag.  The Tale of Jimmie Piggy.  By Marjorie Manners.  The Platt & Nourse Co.: New York. 1918.

 

 

Hey Diddle Diddle, The Cat and The Fiddle!

Illustration:  Hey Diddle Diddle.  Mother Goose’s Nursery Rhymes.  McLoughlin Brothers: New York. Ca 1900.

Hey diddle diddle, the Cat and the Fiddle,

The Cow jumped over the Moon,

The little Dog laughed to see such sport,

And the Dish ran after the Spoon.

Illustration:  Hey Diddle Diddle.  Mother Goose’s Nursery Rhymes.  McLoughlin Brothers: New York. Ca 1900.

Mother Goose’s Nursery Rhymes.

McLoughlin Brothers: New York. Ca 1900.

Mother Loves You! Now Get Out!

Illustration:  Mother.  The Story of The Three Little Pigs.  McLoughlin Bro’s: New York. Ca 1900.

Once upon a time there was an old pig, with three little pigs, and as she had not enough to keep them, she sent them out to seek their fortunes.

The Story of The Three Little Pigs.

McLoughlin Bro’s: New York. Ca 1900.

How Do You Know The Sky Is Falling?

Illustration:  The Sky is Falling.  Chicken Little.  M. A. Donohue & Company: Chicago & New York. 1919

“Oh! I am going to tell the King the sky is falling,” says Chicken Little.

“How do you know?” says Henny Penny.

“I saw it with my eyes, I heard it with my ears, and a piece of it fell on my head.”

“May I come with you?” says Henny Penny.

“Certainly,” says Chicken Little.

 

Chicken Little.

M. A. Donohue & Company: Chicago & New York. 1919

 

 

A Trumpet Blow For The Giant’s Overthrow!

Illustration:  Overthrow Giant.  Jack The Giant Killer.  W. B. Conkey Company: New York. 1898.

“That will I do,” said Jack.

. . . at last they arrived at the abode of the enchanter Galligantua. And as the door was guarded by two ferocious griffins, Jack put on his coat of darkness and marched through without the least fear, for of course the griffins could not see him; and when he got inside he saw an enormous horn, upon which was written: “Whoever can this trumpet blow, shall cause the giant’s overthrow.”

“That will I do,” said Jack, and he blew a tremendous blast that made the castle walls shake. The griffins fell down dead, and then helter-skelter through the great hall rushed a group of terrified animals. All were Princes and Princesses who had been changed into animals by the enchanter Galligantua. Last of all came a beautiful gazelle and a young deer. When these two saw Jack they fawned on him, and followed him till he came to a small study. Here he found the enchanter and cut off his head with his sharp sword, and as he did so, the deer and the gazelle turned into two beautiful sisters.

Jack The Giant Killer.

W. B. Conkey Company: New York. 1898.

Traveling Toward Summer!

Illustration:  Paul, Bimbo and Totzo.  In The Miz.  Written by Grace E. Ward.  Illustrations by Clara E. Atwood.  Little, Brown, & Co.: Boston. 1904.

On they went, Paul and Bimbo and Totzo and the Snow-man, till soon they had left winter behind them and the leaves were thick on the trees and the fields were full of blossoming flowers.

In The Miz.

Written by Grace E. Ward.

Illustrations by Clara E. Atwood.

Little, Brown, & Co.: Boston. 1904.

Great Aero Meet!

Illustration:  Our Own Picture. Billy Whiskers In An Aeroplane.  Written by Frances Trego Montgomery.  Illustrations by Constance White.  The Saalfield Publishing Company: Chicago - Akron, Ohio - New York. 1912.

THERE THEY SAW LARGE PICTURES OF THEMSELVES – THE THREE FAMOUS ANIMALS WHO TRAVELED IN THE AEROPLANE RACE.

Illustration:  Our Own Picture. Billy Whiskers In An Aeroplane.  Written by Frances Trego Montgomery.  Illustrations by Constance White.  The Saalfield Publishing Company: Chicago - Akron, Ohio - New York. 1912.

Billy Whiskers In An Aeroplane.

Written by Frances Trego Montgomery.

Illustrations by Constance White.

The Saalfield Publishing Company: Chicago – Akron, Ohio – New York. 1912.

 

The Little Pig Rock’d The Cradle!

Illustration: Sow With A Saddle.  Mother Goose’s Nursery Rhymes.  McLoughlin Brothers: New York. Ca 1900.

“The Sow With The Saddle.”

The sow came in with the saddle,

The little pig rock’d the cradle,

The dish jump’d up on the table,

To see the pot swallow the ladle.

The spit that stood behind the door

Threw the pudding-stick on the floor.

Odsplut! Said the gridiron,

Can’t you agree?

I’m the constable,

Bring them to me.

 

Mother Goose’s Nursery Rhymes.

McLoughlin Brothers: New York. Ca 1900.

 

Puss Kills Rabbits!

Illustration: Puss and Rabbits.  LITTLE FOLKS STORIES  3 Bears, Puss in Boots, Red Riding Hood.  McLoughlin Bro’s: New York. 1888.

“Puss out-wits the Rabbits”

Through the woods and over the fields he ran till he came near a rabbit warren, when he crept more cautiously for fear some of the bunnies might hear him; for they have very sharp ears. He opened the game-bag, into which he had put some bits of cabbage and fresh parsley, and arranging the strings of the bag in a clever way, waited patiently for a visit from the rabbits.

Presently two or three young ones came hopping up and twitching their long ears. They sniffed around for awhile at the entrance of the bag, and then hopped in and began munching and nibbling at the parsley and cabbage, little thinking of the fate that awaited them. All at once the cat gave the string a jerk, and the bunnies were caught in a trap, and though they kicked ever so hard they couldn’t get out. Puss lost no time in killing them, and slinging the game-bag over his shoulder, he set out for the king’s palace.

Illustration: Puss and Rabbits.  LITTLE FOLKS STORIES  3 Bears, Puss in Boots, Red Riding Hood.  McLoughlin Bro’s: New York. 1888.

LITTLE FOLKS STORIES

3 Bears, Puss in Boots, Red Riding Hood.

McLoughlin Bro’s: New York. 1888.

 

Third Little Pig At The Fair!

Illustration:  Pig At The Fair.  The Story of The Three Little Pigs.  McLoughlin Bro’s: New York. Ca 1900.

At The Fair!

The next day the wolf came again, and said to the little pig, “Little pig there is a fair at Shanklin this afternoon; will you go?”

“Oh yes,” said the pig, “I will be glad to go; what time will you be ready?”

Illustration:  Pig At The Fair.  The Story of The Three Little Pigs.  McLoughlin Bro’s: New York. Ca 1900.

The Story of The Three Little Pigs.

McLoughlin Bro’s: New York. Ca 1900.

The Great Black Cat!

Illustration:  Great Black Cat.  The Magical House of Zur.  By Mary Dickerson Donahey.  Barse & Hopkins: New York. 1914.

The great black cat stalked out in front of the little circle and told the story of “Puss in Boots.”

He turned his great yellow-green eyes upon the row of winged children and they all shivered with joy. To think of sitting up and hearing a cat tell a story!

He began at the beginning, and told the story of “Puss in Boots” as it had never been told before . . .

Illustration:  Great Black Cat.  The Magical House of Zur.  By Mary Dickerson Donahey.  Barse & Hopkins: New York. 1914.

The Magical House of Zur.

By Mary Dickerson Donahey.

Barse & Hopkins: New York. 1914.