Boy Loves Stove – Father Sells Stove – Boy Goes Crazy!

Sin-Nurnberg-Stove-Sq

It is a sin; it is a theft; it is an infamy,” he said, slowly, his eyes fastened on the gilded feet of Hirschvogel.

“Oh, August, do not say such things of father!” sobbed his sister. “Whatever he does, we ought to think it right.”

August laughed aloud.

“Is it right that he should spend his money in drink? – that he should let orders lie unexecuted? – that he should do his work so ill that no one cares to employ him? – that he should live on grandfather’s charity, and then dare sell a thing that is ours every whit as much as it is his? To sell Hirschvogel! Oh, dear God! I would sooner sell my soul!”

Illustration:  "It Is A Sin" from the The Nurnberg Stove.  Louisa de la Rame.  Illustrated by Maria L. Kirk.  J. B. Lippincott Company: Philadelphia and London. 1916.

The Nurnberg Stove.

Louisa de la Rame.

Illustrated by Maria L. Kirk.

J. B. Lippincott Company: Philadelphia and London. 1916.

All The Bric-A-Brac in Motion.

Illustration: "all the bric-a-brac in motion."  Illustrator:  Maria L. Kirk from the Nurnberg Stove by Louisa de la Rame.
“For what he saw was nothing less than all the bric-a-brac in motion.”
The Nurnberg Stove by Louisa de la Rame
Illustrated by Maria L. Kirk
J. B. Lippincott Company: Philadelphia and London. 1916.

Midnight was once more chiming from all the brazen tongues of the city when he awoke, and, all being still around him, ventured to put his head out of the brass door of the stove to see why such a strange bright light was round him.

It was a very strange and brilliant light indeed; and yet, what is perhaps still stranger, it did not frighten or amaze him, nor did what he saw alarm him either, and yet I think it would have done you or me. For what he saw was nothing less than all the bric-a-brac in motion.