Rats Are Medicine!

Illustration:  Better Again.  Our Dear Dogs.  Father Tuck’s Happy Hour Series.  Raphael Tuck & Sons, Ltd.: London-Paris-Berlin-New York-Montreal. Printed in the Fine Art Works in Saxony.  Publishers to Their Majesties The King & Queen, & Her Majesty Queen Alexandra. Ca 1910.

Better Again.

It’s all right, I am happy to say. We had not to send for the dog-doctor after all. Bob is better, indeed he is quite well, somebody called out “Rats,” and up he jumped, and flew out of his kennel, and was off with Jim, the fox terrier on a rat hunt. My brother says he was shamming. Perhaps you don’t know what that is, it means that he was pretending to be ill, but I don’t think so myself, I believe that the very name of rats is like a medicine to Bob, and does him good.


Our Dear Dogs.

Father Tuck’s Happy Hour Series.

Raphael Tuck & Sons, Ltd.: London-Paris-Berlin-New York-Montreal. Printed in the Fine Art Works in Saxony.

Publishers to Their Majesties The King & Queen, & Her Majesty Queen Alexandra. Ca 1910.

Do Things Keep Getting Better?

Illustration:  “There sat the dog, with eyes as large as tea-cups.”  From the story "The Tinder-Box."  Hans Andersen’s Fairy Tales.  By William Woodburn.  Illustrated by Gordon Robinson.  W. & R. Chambers, Limited: London & Edinburgh. 1917.

“There sat the dog, with eyes as large as tea-cups.”

He opened the first door. Yes, there sat the dog, with eyes as large as tea-cups, staring at him.

“There’s a good dog!” said the soldier, as he spread the witch’s apron on the floor, and lifted the beast on to it. He then filled his pockets with the copper coins in the chest, shut the lid, put the dog back into his place, and passed on into the second room.

There sat the second dog, with eyes as large as mill-stones.

“You had really better not stare at me so,” said the soldier; “it will hurt your eyes!” As he said this he set the dog down on the witch’s apron and lifted the lid of the chest. No sooner did he catch sight of all the silver it held than he threw away his copper coins, and filled his pockets and his knapsack with the shining silver.

He now passed on into the third room. What a start he got! A dog in this room had a pair of eyes each as large as a big round tower, and they kept rolling round and round in his head like wheels.

.

From the story “The Tinder-Box.”

Hans Andersen’s Fairy Tales.

By William Woodburn.

Illustrated by Gordon Robinson.

W. & R. Chambers, Limited: London & Edinburgh. 1917.

Lady Fall Is Passing By!

Illustration:  Lady Fall’s Harvest Ride  A YEAR WITH THE FAIRIES.  Written by Anna M. Scott.  Illustrations by M. T. Ross.  Published by P. F. Volland & Co.: Chicago. 1914.

Lady Fall’s Harvest Ride

 On harvest chariot piled sky high

Lady Fall is passing by

With garnered fruits and wealth untold

Of royal purple mixed with gold.

 

To Lady Summer’s farewell nod

She waves a plume of Goldenrod,

And as the birds fly south again,

She cries, “Good-bye, auf Wiedersehen.”

 

Lady Fall’s Harvest Ride

A YEAR WITH THE FAIRIES.

Written by Anna M. Scott.

Illustrations by M. T. Ross.

Published by P. F. Volland & Co.: Chicago. 1914.

 

Please Help Poor Bossy!

Illustration:  “Poor bossy!”  Mary’s Little Lamb.  Henry Altemus Company: Philadelphia. 1906.

The cow, when she saw the little girls, went “Moo-oo-oo!” as if she were trying to say, “Can’t you help me?”

“Poor bossy!” said Alice; “I’ll try and help you.”

It was hard work, but after patient efforts bossy was released, and then she went “Moo-oo” again, as though she said, “Thank you.”

.

Mary’s Little Lamb.

Henry Altemus Company: Philadelphia. 1906.

Frog Attack!

Illustration:  WHAT IS IT?   Artwork by Robert Morley (1893)  PETER PIPER’S PEEP SHOW or All the Fun of the Fair  Written by S. H. Hamer.  With Illustrations by Lewis Baumer and Harry B. Neilson.  Cassell And Company, Ltd.: London, Paris, New York & Melbourne. 1906.

WHAT IS IT?

I soon saw that, after all, the food was not my sort, so I went off again directly, but not before one of the Yellow Things had plucked up courage to come back and actually threaten to attack me – me, . .

PETER PIPER’S PEEP SHOW or All the Fun of the Fair

Written by S. H. Hamer.

With Illustrations by Lewis Baumer and Harry B. Neilson.

Cassell And Company, Ltd.: London, Paris, New York & Melbourne. 1906.

Artwork by Robert Morley (1893)

A Very Superior Dog!

Illustration:  “Dash, the Dachshund.”  Our Dear Dogs.  Father Tuck’s Happy Hour Series.  Raphael Tuck & Sons, Ltd.: London-Paris-Berlin-New York-Montreal. Printed in the Fine Art Works in Saxony.  Publishers to Their Majesties The King & Queen, & Her Majesty Queen Alexandra. Ca 1910.

“Dash, the Dachshund.”

This is not our dog, he belongs to a friend of ours and often comes to see us. He is quite at home at our place and is very friendly with our dogs.

Dash is a very polite and gentlemanly creature, his coat is sleek and shiny and is always beautifully clean, and he hates the wet and mud, and is most careful where he walks. Altogether he is a very superior dog.

 

Our Dear Dogs.

Father Tuck’s Happy Hour Series.

Raphael Tuck & Sons, Ltd.: London-Paris-Berlin-New York-Montreal. Printed in the Fine Art Works in Saxony.

Publishers to Their Majesties The King & Queen, & Her Majesty Queen Alexandra. Ca 1910.

See Saw!

Illustration:  See saw, Margery Daw  Mother Goose - Volland Popular Edition.  Edited by Eulalie Osgood Grover.  Illustrated by Frederick Richardson.  Published by P. F. Volland Company: New York, Chicago & Toronto. 1921.

See saw, Margery Daw,

Jacky shall have a new master:

Jacky must have but a penny a day

Because he can work no faster.

.

Mother Goose – Volland Popular Edition.

Edited by Eulalie Osgood Grover.

Illustrated by Frederick Richardson.

Published by P. F. Volland Company: New York, Chicago & Toronto. 1921.

 

 

Pig In A Pear Tree!

Illustration:  Pig In A Pear Tree.  The Story of The Three Little Pigs.  McLoughlin Bro’s: New York. Ca 1900.

Well, the little pig bustled up the next morning at four o’clock, and went off for the pears, hoping to get back before the wolf came. But he had further to go, and had to climb the tree, so that just as he was getting down from it he saw the wolf coming, which, as you may suppose, frightened him very much. When the wolf came up he said, “What! are you here before me? are they nice pears?” “Yes, very,” said the little pig. “I will throw you down one;” and he threw it so far that while the wolf was going to pick it up, the little pig jumped down and ran home.

.

The Story of The Three Little Pigs.

McLoughlin Bro’s: New York. Ca 1900.

Playing With Your Chums!

Illustration:  FIVE HAPPY DAYS THE CHUMS SPENT HERE, EATING, DRINKING, PLAYING WITH THE CHILDREN.  Billy Whiskers, Jr. and His Chums.  By Frances Trego Montgomery.  Illustrated by Hugo von Hofsten.  The Saalfield, Publishing Company: Chicago, Akron, Ohio & New York. 1907.

FIVE HAPPY DAYS THE CHUMS SPENT HERE, EATING, DRINKING, PLAYING WITH THE CHILDREN.

Billy Whiskers, Jr. and His Chums.

By Frances Trego Montgomery.

Illustrated by Hugo von Hofsten.

The Saalfield, Publishing Company: Chicago, Akron, Ohio & New York. 1907.

Her Fatal Moment!

Illustration:  Lovers On The Sofa.  Billy Whiskers in the Movies.  By Frances Trego Montgomery.  Illustrated by Paul Hawthorne.  The Saalfield Publishing Company: Akron, Ohio and New York. 1921.

When everything had quieted down and the two lovers were sitting side by side on the sofa, the actress, pretending she was shy, picked up Button and held him up to her face to kiss. Fatal moment for her, for true to his plans, Button planted one claw in her wig and pulled it down over her eyes, while with the other forepaw he scratched her face and clawed her breast with his hind ones.

.

Billy Whiskers in the Movies.

By Frances Trego Montgomery.

Illustrated by Paul Hawthorne.

The Saalfield Publishing Company: Akron, Ohio and New York. 1921.

Time Won’t Wait For Me!

Illustration:  “Idle Hands Make Sad Hearts.”  NURSERY COLORED PICTURE BOOK.  McLOUGHLIN BROS.: NEW YORK. Ca 1870.

“Idle Hands Make Sad Hearts.”

You little bee,

Come play with me,

The sunshine’s warm and clear;

You need not fear

The cold severe,

The winter is not near.

My little maid,

I can’t be stayed,

I must not lose to-day.

For time, you see,

Won’t wait for me,

But sweeps the flowers away.

.

NURSERY COLORED PICTURE BOOK.

McLOUGHLIN BROS.: NEW YORK. Ca 1870.

Bread – Not A Good Stepping Stone!

Illustration:  "The Girl who trod on a loaf."  “So the girl put on her best clothes and her newest shoes.”   .  Hans Andersen’s Fairy Tales.  By William Woodburn.  Illustrated by Gordon Robinson.  W. & R. Chambers, Limited: London & Edinburgh. 1917.

“So the girl put on her best clothes and her newest shoes.”

So the girl put on her best clothes and her newest shoes, and lifted up her skirts, so that they would neither get dirty themselves nor soil her shoes. In this she was very wise; but she was neither wise nor good in something else that she did.

When she came to a road across a marsh, she found there was a great deal of mud and many pools of water. One of the pools was so deep that she flung the loaf into it, so that she might step on it, and thus get over the pool dry-shod.

But no sooner was her foot on the loaf than she began to sink. Down and down she went – first up to the waist, then up to the shoulders. At last she was quite out of sight, and there was only a bubbling in the pool to show where she had been!

.

“The Girl who trod on a loaf.”

.

Hans Andersen’s Fairy Tales.

By William Woodburn.

Illustrated by Gordon Robinson.

W. & R. Chambers, Limited: London & Edinburgh. 1917.

Story Time For Goats!

Illustration:  ON THE ISLAND.  Prattles For Our Boys and Girls.  Hurst & Co.: New York. 1912.

ON THE ISLAND.

. . . Old Janet settled herself a little further off, winking and blinking at thought of the pleasure at hand.  For at these times Nellie told them stories; and if you think they did not understand, I can only say that it was Nellie’e belief that her goats understood every word.


From the story “Nellie Ogg And Her Goats.”

Prattles For Our Boys and Girls.

Hurst & Co.: New York. 1912.

Jimmie’s Happy Veterans Day!

Illustration:  The Tale of Jimmie Piggy.  By Marjorie Manners  The Platt & Nourse Co.: New York. 1918.

“Jimmie,” said his brother Tom, as he gave the fish to his mamma, “let’s play we are sailors. We can use mamma’s tubs for boats, and fasten our flags onto them.”

“All right, Tom,” returned Jimmie, “we will play the tubs are battleships, and that we are the captains, and we can pretend to shoot big cannons at each other.”

This was great fun, and went along nicely until Jimmie got so excited that he tipped over his boat, and then there was a great squealing.

 

The Tale of Jimmie Piggy.

By Marjorie Manners

The Platt & Nourse Co.: New York. 1918.

What Would The Lobster Think?

Illustration: What Would You Do? Mary’s Little Lamb. Henry Altemus Company: Philadelphia. 1906.

“WHAT WOULD YOU THINK?”

If you saw pennies not round but square,

Or an oyster walking down the stair,

Or a lobster sitting in your arm-chair –

What would you think?

.

If I saw all these things, or some,

I’m sure I’d say that I had come

To the land of Topsy-turvydom –

What would you think?

.

Mary’s Little Lamb.

Henry Altemus Company: Philadelphia. 1906.

Land Of Topsy-Turvydom!

Illustration:  What Would You Do?  Mary’s Little Lamb.  Henry Altemus Company: Philadelphia. 1906.

 

“WHAT WOULD YOU THINK?”

If you saw an elephant climb a tree

Or a snail in an eggshell go to sea,

Or a donkey drinking a cup of tea –

What would you think?

 

If you saw houses upside down,

A beggar wearing a golden crown,

If the stars were red and the clouds were brown –

What would you think?

 

If you saw pennies not round but square,

Or an oyster walking down the stair,

Or a lobster sitting in your arm-chair –

What would you think?

 

If I saw all these things, or some,

I’m sure I’d say that I had come

To the land of Topsy-turvydom –

What would you think?

.

Mary’s Little Lamb.

Henry Altemus Company: Philadelphia. 1906.

 

Fairy Candles In The Sky!

Illustration:  The Candle-Lighters  A Year With the Fairies.  Written by Anna M. Scott.  Illustrations by M. T. (Penny) Ross.  P. F. Volland & Co.: Chicago, U.S.A. 1914.

The Candle-Lighters

When shadows creep at eventide

And little ones are safe inside,

Bright stars a-twinkling way up high

Are Fairies’ candles in the sky.

When shadows creep at eventide

The Fairies take their evening ride;

On flitting fireflies wafted high

They light their candles in the sky.

 

A Year With the Fairies.

Written by Anna M. Scott.

Illustrations by M. T. (Penny) Ross.

P. F. Volland & Co.: Chicago, U.S.A. 1914.

The Joy Of Jumping!

Illustration:  “The princess had just time to give one delighted shriek of laughter before the water closed over them.”     From the story "The Light Princess."  Fairy Tales Every Child Should Know.  Edited by: Hamilton Wright Mabie.  Illustrated and Decorated by: Mary Hamilton Fry.  George Sully & Company: New York. 1915.

“The princess had just time to give one delighted shriek of laughter before the water closed over them.”

 

From the story “The Light Princess.”

Fairy Tales Every Child Should Know.

Edited by: Hamilton Wright Mabie.

Illustrated and Decorated by: Mary Hamilton Fry.

George Sully & Company: New York. 1915.

Picture Of A Woodchuck.

Illustration:   THE WOODCHUCK’S PORTRAIT.  Tom Thumb and Other Stories.  McLoughlin Brothers: New York. Ca 1904.

THE WOODCHUCK’S PORTRAIT.

Sit still, Mr. Woodchuck,

As still as can be,

Till the picture is finished

And then you shall see.

.

It is not every woodchuck

Who has such a chance

As this set before him,

His worth to enhance.

.

Tom Thumb and Other Stories.

McLoughlin Brothers: New York. Ca 1904.

The Devil In The Graveyard!

Illustration:  “Stupid Devil,” cried the soldier, “it won’t do!. . .”  THE GRAVE-MOUND.  Grimm’s Fairy Tales.  Translated from the German By Margaret Hunt.  Illustrated By John B. Gruelle.  Cupples and Leon Company: New York. Ca 1914.

“Stupid Devil,” cried the soldier, “it won’t do!. . .”

THE GRAVE-MOUND.

Grimm’s Fairy Tales.

Translated from the German By Margaret Hunt.

Illustrated By John B. Gruelle.

Cupples and Leon Company: New York. Ca 1914.

The Pumpkin Eater Was A Bad Husband!

Illustration:  Peter, Peter, Pumpkin Eater.  Mother Goose  Volland Popular Edition.  Edited by Eulalie Osgood Grover.  Illustrated by Frederick Richardson.  Published by P. F. Volland Company: New York, Chicago & Toronto. 1921.

Peter, Peter, pumpkin eater,

Had a wife and couldn’t keep her;

He put her in a pumpkin shell,

And then he kept her very well.

 

Peter, Peter, pumpkin eater,

Had another, and didn’t love her;

Peter learned to read and spell,

And then he loved her very well.

 

Mother Goose

Volland Popular Edition.

Edited by Eulalie Osgood Grover.

Illustrated by Frederick Richardson.

Published by P. F. Volland Company: New York, Chicago & Toronto. 1921.