Stranger Danger!

Illustration:  Scarecrow.  The Three Bears’ Picture Book.  Illustrated by Walter Crane.  George Routledge and Sons: London & New York.

“The scarecrow was so sympathetic that they became great friends.”

So he stumbled along by himself till he came to a clearing. There were bright red flags fluttering on the edges of it, and in the middle of the field stood a tall, thin man with a gun pointing straight at Paul.

.

In The Miz.

Written by Grace E. Ward.

Illustrations by Clara E. Atwood.

Little, Brown, & Co.: Boston. 1904.

Lost – Strayed or Stolen!

Illustration:  From the Story:  "ARKONAUTIC EXPEDITION."  In The Miz.  Written by Grace E. Ward.  Illustrations by Clara E. Atwood.  Little, Brown, & Co.: Boston. 1904.

“The Welsh Rabbit took another bite of toasted bread, and sobbed aloud.”

Paul opened the door and saw a strange sight. Ted’s Noah’s Ark was standing in the centre of the room, and all the animals were trotting about as they pleased.

[Sign] “Lost – Strayed or Stolen, A Wooden Japheth. Inquire Within.”

From the Story:  “ARKONAUTIC EXPEDITION.”

In The Miz.

Written by Grace E. Ward.

Illustrations by Clara E. Atwood.

Little, Brown, & Co.: Boston. 1904.

Traveling Toward Summer!

Illustration:  Paul, Bimbo and Totzo.  In The Miz.  Written by Grace E. Ward.  Illustrations by Clara E. Atwood.  Little, Brown, & Co.: Boston. 1904.

On they went, Paul and Bimbo and Totzo and the Snow-man, till soon they had left winter behind them and the leaves were thick on the trees and the fields were full of blossoming flowers.

In The Miz.

Written by Grace E. Ward.

Illustrations by Clara E. Atwood.

Little, Brown, & Co.: Boston. 1904.

Wizard In a Teacup On a Lemonade Sea!

"A STORY FOR FRANCES" from  In The Miz.  Written by Grace E. Ward.  Illustrations by Clara E. Atwood.  Little, Brown, & Co.: Boston. 1904.

“They’ve had their bowl mended, and now they are going off on another voyage.”

“Come on,” said a boy to the Man. “Come and see them off.”

“See who off?”

“Why, the Three Wise Men of Gotham. They’ve had their bowl mended, and now they are going off on another voyage.”

So they all ran down to the beach, and there to be sure, was a very large bowl tossing around on the ocean, which wasn’t of salt water at all, like that at Squirrel Island, but made all of lemonade.

“All ashore going ashore!” called out the wisest of the Wisemen, and pulled up the dictionary which they used as an anchor, and pushed the bowl off the shore with a lemonade ladle. All the little boys and girls screamed “Good-bye! Good-bye!” and began to play having a tea-party.

"A STORY FOR FRANCES" from  In The Miz.  Written by Grace E. Ward.  Illustrations by Clara E. Atwood.  Little, Brown, & Co.: Boston. 1904.

“A STORY FOR FRANCES” from

In The Miz.

Written by Grace E. Ward.

Illustrations by Clara E. Atwood.

Little, Brown, & Co.: Boston. 1904.

 

Peeking Is A Serious Crime!

Illustration:  Jury of Tulips.  In The Miz.  Written by Grace E. Ward.  Illustrations by Clara E. Atwood.  Little, Brown, & Co.: Boston. 1904.

“On each side of him were growing six crimson and gold tulips”

The Chief Justice sat on the throne, and on each side of him were growing six crimson and gold tulips with their blossoms tightly closed.

“Let the prisoner be brought in,” said the Chief Justice; and as he spoke the twelve tulips slowly opened and in each sat a little man. These were the jury-men, who had never seen the light of day until the tulips opened, so they made excellent jury-men, as they knew absolutely nothing.

Then there was a great whirr-rr-rr—and the Great White Stork flew in, carrying in his bill a little girl who looked very scared.

“What has this child done?” asked the Chief Justice.

“She was playing hide-and-seek, and she peeked,” said the Stork.

“That is a dreadful thing. Can you bring any witnesses that saw her peek?” said the Chief Justice.

 

In The Miz.

Written by Grace E. Ward.

Illustrations by Clara E. Atwood.

Little, Brown, & Co.: Boston. 1904.

 

 

Police-Bouy – A Bad Joke?

Head-of-the-Tide-Water-In-The-Miz

“Because,” said the face, “I am the Head of Tide Water, . .”

. . . At last appeared a dark object on the surface of the water, and as they came nearer, a long neck could be seen, with a head that grinned at Jan and said:

“I guess you can go on a bit farther, my man.”

“I intend to,” said Jan. “Why not?”

“Because,” said the face, “I am the Head of Tide Water, and it’s only small boats that can go by me. I turn all the rest back.”

“I see,” said Jan, “sort of a river-policeman.”

“No, a police-bouy,” said the Head of Tide Water, and laughed very loud because he had made a bad joke.

Illustration From the Story: JAN THE LION KILLER  In The Miz.  Written by Grace E. Ward.  Illustrations by Clara E. Atwood.  Little, Brown, & Co.: Boston. 1904.

From the Story: JAN THE LION KILLER

In The Miz.

Written by Grace E. Ward.

Illustrations by Clara E. Atwood.

Little, Brown, & Co.: Boston. 1904.