Trouble Ahead!

Illustration:  The Queen and Elise.  The Witch Makes Ready the Magic Drink.  From the story "The Wild Swans."  Hans Andersen’s Fairy Tales.  By William Woodburn.  Illustrated by Gordon Robinson.  W. & R. Chambers, Limited: London & Edinburgh. 1917.

The Queen and Elise.

The Witch Makes Ready the Magic Drink.

From the story “The Wild Swans.”

Hans Andersen’s Fairy Tales.

By William Woodburn.

Illustrated by Gordon Robinson.

W. & R. Chambers, Limited: London & Edinburgh. 1917.

Bring Me His Eyes Or Yours!

Illustration:  “Think of your own shoe.”  From the story "The Traveling Companions."  Hans Andersen’s Fairy Tales.  By William Woodburn.  Illustrated by Gordon Robinson.  W. & R. Chambers, Limited: London & Edinburgh. 1917.

“Think of your own shoe.”

After the dancing had gone on for some time, the princess told the wizard that another young man had come to seek her hand, and asked what she should think of next morning when he came up to the palace to guess her thoughts.

“Listen! I will tell you,” replied the wizard. “Choose something very easy and simple, and he will be less likely to think of it. Think of your own shoe; he will never guess that. Then you can have his head cut off. But, mind! don’t forget to bring me his eyes to-morrow night. I will have either them or your own. Remember our bargain!”

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From the story “The Traveling Companions.”

Hans Andersen’s Fairy Tales.

By William Woodburn.

Illustrated by Gordon Robinson.

W. & R. Chambers, Limited: London & Edinburgh. 1917.

Do Things Keep Getting Better?

Illustration:  “There sat the dog, with eyes as large as tea-cups.”  From the story "The Tinder-Box."  Hans Andersen’s Fairy Tales.  By William Woodburn.  Illustrated by Gordon Robinson.  W. & R. Chambers, Limited: London & Edinburgh. 1917.

“There sat the dog, with eyes as large as tea-cups.”

He opened the first door. Yes, there sat the dog, with eyes as large as tea-cups, staring at him.

“There’s a good dog!” said the soldier, as he spread the witch’s apron on the floor, and lifted the beast on to it. He then filled his pockets with the copper coins in the chest, shut the lid, put the dog back into his place, and passed on into the second room.

There sat the second dog, with eyes as large as mill-stones.

“You had really better not stare at me so,” said the soldier; “it will hurt your eyes!” As he said this he set the dog down on the witch’s apron and lifted the lid of the chest. No sooner did he catch sight of all the silver it held than he threw away his copper coins, and filled his pockets and his knapsack with the shining silver.

He now passed on into the third room. What a start he got! A dog in this room had a pair of eyes each as large as a big round tower, and they kept rolling round and round in his head like wheels.

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From the story “The Tinder-Box.”

Hans Andersen’s Fairy Tales.

By William Woodburn.

Illustrated by Gordon Robinson.

W. & R. Chambers, Limited: London & Edinburgh. 1917.

Bread – Not A Good Stepping Stone!

Illustration:  "The Girl who trod on a loaf."  “So the girl put on her best clothes and her newest shoes.”   .  Hans Andersen’s Fairy Tales.  By William Woodburn.  Illustrated by Gordon Robinson.  W. & R. Chambers, Limited: London & Edinburgh. 1917.

“So the girl put on her best clothes and her newest shoes.”

So the girl put on her best clothes and her newest shoes, and lifted up her skirts, so that they would neither get dirty themselves nor soil her shoes. In this she was very wise; but she was neither wise nor good in something else that she did.

When she came to a road across a marsh, she found there was a great deal of mud and many pools of water. One of the pools was so deep that she flung the loaf into it, so that she might step on it, and thus get over the pool dry-shod.

But no sooner was her foot on the loaf than she began to sink. Down and down she went – first up to the waist, then up to the shoulders. At last she was quite out of sight, and there was only a bubbling in the pool to show where she had been!

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“The Girl who trod on a loaf.”

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Hans Andersen’s Fairy Tales.

By William Woodburn.

Illustrated by Gordon Robinson.

W. & R. Chambers, Limited: London & Edinburgh. 1917.