Peeking Is A Serious Crime!

Illustration:  Jury of Tulips.  In The Miz.  Written by Grace E. Ward.  Illustrations by Clara E. Atwood.  Little, Brown, & Co.: Boston. 1904.

“On each side of him were growing six crimson and gold tulips”

The Chief Justice sat on the throne, and on each side of him were growing six crimson and gold tulips with their blossoms tightly closed.

“Let the prisoner be brought in,” said the Chief Justice; and as he spoke the twelve tulips slowly opened and in each sat a little man. These were the jury-men, who had never seen the light of day until the tulips opened, so they made excellent jury-men, as they knew absolutely nothing.

Then there was a great whirr-rr-rr—and the Great White Stork flew in, carrying in his bill a little girl who looked very scared.

“What has this child done?” asked the Chief Justice.

“She was playing hide-and-seek, and she peeked,” said the Stork.

“That is a dreadful thing. Can you bring any witnesses that saw her peek?” said the Chief Justice.

 

In The Miz.

Written by Grace E. Ward.

Illustrations by Clara E. Atwood.

Little, Brown, & Co.: Boston. 1904.

 

 

9 thoughts on “Peeking Is A Serious Crime!

  1. Ha, ha, just lovely. I wonder what was the verdict. One day I’m gonna gather a pile of these books and enjoy them! Of course, I have to start with Andersen 🙂

    1. This book is filled with very strange stories! Andersen’s fairy tales are disturbing – especially the older versions – the new versions are often written with contemporary notions about what children should hear and like to hear – they are very sweetened up.
      Elephant

      1. I didn’t know that, and I have to say that I hear more and more and like less and less this kind of censure. Yes, I guess you could Andersen is disturbing, perhaps that’s why I don’t remember paying any special attention to him as a child, but returning to him as an adult, for stories like The Little Matchbox Girl, The Snow Queen or The Sand Hills of Jutland.

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